migraine

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mi·graine

(mī'grān, mi-grān'),
A familial, recurrent syndrome characterized usually by unilateral head pain, accompanied by various focal disturbances of the nervous system, particularly in regard to visual phenomenon, such as scintillating scotomas. Classified as classic migraine, common migraine, cluster headache, hemiplegic migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, and ophthalmic migraine.
[through O. Fr., fr. G. hēmi- krania, pain on one side of the head, fr. hēmi-, half, + kranion, skull]

migraine

An intense idiopathic, episodic, uni/bilateral, pulsating (vascular) headache, often exacerbated by physical activity, linked to dilation of branches of the carotid artery.

Clinical findings
Classic migraines are most common in women age 30–49 and in lower income households, and appear to have a hereditary component. Migraines first appear before puberty and remit at menopause; they may be accompanied or preceded by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia, and photophobia or other visual phenomena (e.g., hemianopia, scotomas, fortification phenomenon).

Management
Analgesics (e.g., aspirin, acetaminophen, propoxyphen, codeine), NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen, ibuprofen, ketorolac), 5-HT agonists (e.g., ergotamine, sumatryptan), dopamine antagonist (e.g., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide).
 
Prevention
Avoid precipitating factors; if conservative measures fail and the attacks are > 1/week, pharmacologic prophylaxis is indicated, which may be 5-HT influencing (e.g., amitriptyline, methysergide1), β-adrenergic antagonist (e.g., propranolol, metoprolol), calcium channel blocker (e.g., nifedipine, verapamil) or NSAIDs (e.g., ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, aspirin).

migraine

Hemicrania, sick headache Neurology An intense idiopathic, episodic, uni/bilateral, pulsating–vascular headache, often exacerbated by physical activity, linked to dilation of branches of the carotid artery Clinical 'Classic' migraines are most common in ♀ age 30-49, and in lower income households, and appear to have a hereditary component; migraines first appear before puberty and remit at menopause; they may be accompanied or preceded by N&V, photophobia, other visual phenomena–eg, hemianopia, scotomas, fortification phenomenon, phonophobia Treatment Analgesics–eg, aspirin, acetaminophen, propoxyphen, codeine, NSAIDs–eg, naproxen, ibuprofen, ketorolac, 5-HT agonists–eg, ergotamine, sumatryptan, dopamine antagonist–eg, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide Prevention Avoid precipitating factors; if conservative measures fail and the attacks are > 1/wk, pharmacologic prophylaxis is indicated, which may be 5-HT-influencing–eg, amitriptyline, methysergide, β-adrenergic antagonist–eg, propranolol, metoprolol, calcium channel blocker–eg, nifedipine, verapamil, NSAIDs–eg, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, aspirin, sumatriptan. See Aura, Basilar migraine, Classical migraine, Common migraine, Footballer's headache, Menstrual migraine, Mixed tension, Ophthalmoplegic migraine, Retinal migraine.

mi·graine

(mī'grān)
A symptom complex occurring periodically and characterized by pain in the head (usually unilateral), vertigo, nausea and vomiting, and photophobia. Onset of pain may be preceded by a warning (i.e., aura), often consisting of bilateral scintillating scotomas. Subtypes include classic migraine, common migraine, cluster headache, hemiplegic migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, and ophthalmic migraine.
Synonym(s): hemicrania (1) , sick headache.
[through O. Fr., fr. G. hēmi-krania, pain on one side of the head, fr. hēmi-, half, + kranion, skull]

migraine

A particular form of headache caused by widening (dilatation) of some of the arteries of the scalp and brain, usually on one side. The widening is preceded by partial closure of these arteries (spasm) and this often causes temporary disturbance of brain function. Most commonly, this takes the form of an expanding, one-sided blank area in the field of vision, with a sparkling (scintillating) jagged border. Such an episode usually lasts for about 20 min. Other neurological disturbances may occur, such as weakness or loss of sensation on the face or down one side of the body or speech or comprehension defects. The headache that follows these effects may be severe and there is nausea and sometimes vomiting and great intolerance to light. Migraine is treated with various drugs including ergotamine tartrate, beta-blockers such as PROPRANOLOL, antidepressants such as amitryptyline, and the serotonin antagonist METHYSERGIDE. The term migraine comes from the words ‘hemi-cranial’, meaning half-head.

Migraine

A throbbing headache that usually affects only one side of the head. Nausea, vomiting, increased sensitivity to light, and other symptoms often accompany migraine.

migraine

An intense and recurring pain usually confined to one side of the head and often accompanied by vertigo, nausea and vomiting, photophobia and scintillating appearances of light and even hemianopia. See visual aura; metamorphopsia; scintillating scotoma.

mi·graine

(mī'grān)
A familial, recurrent syndrome usually characterized by unilateral head pain, accompanied by various focal disturbances of the nervous system, particularly in regard to visual phenomenon, e.g., scintillating scotomas.

Patient discussion about migraine

Q. what is migraine???

A. this is a disease

Q. What the reasons to the migraine?

A. A migraine headache has many triggers- among which are different foods (cheese, red wine), drinking coffee or caffeine containing beverages, lack of sleep, smoking, drinking alcohol, exposure to strong noise and more. There is also a genetic factor, and you see migraine more in people whose relatives suffer from it too.

Q. What Is a Migraine? I have these headaches and my doctor says it sounds like I’m suffering from migraines. What exactly are migraines?

A.
A migraine is a situation that generally combines a headache with certain characteristics, such as increased sensitivity to light, pulsating pain, usually only one sided and that lasts no longer than 72 hours. It is usually a phenomenon that runs in the family, and sometimes can be very difficult to overcome. Here are some tips about dealing with a migraine- http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Treat-Headaches-21797151

More discussions about migraine
References in periodicals archive ?
The role of autonomic features accompanying migraines and migrainous features accompanying CH needs to be clarified (8).
Lempert, "The interrelations of migraine, vertigo, and migrainous vertigo," Neurology, vol.
Use of Vitex agnus-castus in migrainous women with premenstrual syndrome: an open-label clinical observation.
The present research was designed to investigate the abortive and preventive treatment of chronic migrainous daily headache by local subcutaneous steroid injection.
All the patients in this study were between the age group of 20-50 years with CGH without migrainous headache tension type headache and diagnosed depression cases VBI having history of cervical surgeries CVA TIA and pregnant females.
After 10 years researchers found that the proportion of patients who ever reported a headache increased to 58% , with only 2% of subjects reporting a "lupus headache" that is described by the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI) as a "severe, persistent headache: which may be migrainous, but unresponsive to narcotic analgesia."
* Migrainous headaches, the group that includes migraine.
Orthostatic headache is the prototypical manifestation of SIH but various other headache syndromes have also been reported, for example migrainous, tension and non-specific headaches (3).
6 Lupus headache Severe persistent headache may be migrainous, but must be nonresponsive to narcotic analgesia.
Weisskoff et al., "Perfusion-weighted imaging defects during spontaneous migrainous aura," Annals of Neurology, vol.
There were 35 cases of Meniere's disease, 26 cases of heart diseases, 26 cases caused by abnormal blood pressure, 25 cases of psychological disorders, 21 cases of infectious diseases, 20 cases of syncope, 17 cases of sudden deafness, 11 cases of vestibular neuronitis, 7 cases of other ear diseases, 6 cases of migrainous vertigo and 5 cases of vertebrobasilar infarction.
Contemporary management of migrainous disorders in pregnancy.