midwife

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midwife

 [mid´wīf]
a person who assists at childbirth but who is not a physician.
nurse-midwife see nurse-midwife.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf),
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
[A.S. mid, with, + wif, wife]

midwife

/mid·wife/ (-wīf) an individual who practices midwifery; see nurse-midwife.

midwife

Etymology: AS, midd + wif
1 also called obstetrix. (in traditional use) a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2 (according to the International Confederation of Midwives, World Health Organization, and Federation of International Gynecologists and Obstetricians) "a person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program fully recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery." Among the responsibilities of the midwife are supervision of pregnancy, labor, delivery, and puerperium. The midwife conducts the delivery independently, cares for the newborn, procures medical assistance when necessary, executes emergency measures as required, and may practice in a hospital, clinic, maternity home, or private home. The midwife, whose practice may also include well-child care, family planning, and some aspects of gynecology, is often an important source of health counseling in the community.
3 a nurse midwife or Certified Nurse Midwife.

midwife

Medspeak-UK
A trained health professional in the UK, typically female, who provides assistance and primary medical care to women throughout pregnancy, monitoring its course, attending labour and delivery, following the new mother for up to 28 days after birth, assisting with breast feeding, neonatal care and so on.

Medspeak-US
A formally trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth; midwifery is undergoing a resurgence in popularity in the US, as it provides obstetric services for lower-income women and is a delivery option chosen by some upper-income women who desire a greater involvement in childbirth.

midwife

Obstetrics A trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth or, in many situations, is the primary provider of obstetric care Salary $66K + 9% bonus. See Alternative birthing center, Alternative gynecology, Certified nurse midwife, Doula, Granny midwife, Lay midwife, Natural childbirth; Cf Lamaze technique.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
See also: doula

midwife,

n a woman who attends another woman during pregnancy and labor, an expert practitioner in the care of expectant women and the delivery of uncomplicated pregnancies.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.

midwife,

n 1. in traditional use, a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2. a nurse practitioner trained and experienced in assisting women in childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The continued emphasis on the narrative accounts of African American midwives within the history of not only midwifery in the United States but also African American culture and life opens up possibilities for important discussions of race and the effects of a legacy of racism that still affects contemporary midwives in their efforts to become legalized and legitimated throughout the United States.
Midwives are health care professionals who enable women to give birth safely.
Mary Mascher introduced HF 781 to give legal recognition by licensing direct entry midwives.
16) More insidious was the work of the above-mentioned John Elleray, who was in the business of harassing unlicensed midwives.
Given that midwives are such a practical and affordable solution to many maternal- and community-health problems, it is baffling that world leaders who claim to stand for women and children's safety do not give midwifery more political support.
Rim Bent Hedi Sdiri, a Head Nurse in the Labor and Delivery Unit at HMC's Women's Hospital, said the International Day of the Midwife is a day to pause and recognize the role midwives play in keeping women and their babies safe during one of life's major events.
Amal Khiari specified that the 3,000 Tunisian midwives who work in the public and private sectors claim the regularisation of their situation and the guarantee of their legal protection.
England remains 3,500 full-time midwives short - a shortage that has now lasted for over a generation.
For midwives, providing continuity of care to women is a satisfying way to work, and in itself contributes to sustainable practice (Collins et al.
Many women do see the same midwife in the antenatal and postnatal periods already, but midwives don't always rotate into the labour areas.
During 2014, nominations were sent in from mums across the country, who felt their midwives deserved that extra bit of recognition.
The new resource 'Midwives and Medicines (NI) 2014', was developed through a partnership arrangement with midwives and pharmacists from Northern Ireland (NI) and aims to provides midwives with up to date information on medicines management through: