midwife

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midwife

 [mid´wīf]
a person who assists at childbirth but who is not a physician.
nurse-midwife see nurse-midwife.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf),
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
[A.S. mid, with, + wif, wife]

midwife

/mid·wife/ (-wīf) an individual who practices midwifery; see nurse-midwife.

midwife

Etymology: AS, midd + wif
1 also called obstetrix. (in traditional use) a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2 (according to the International Confederation of Midwives, World Health Organization, and Federation of International Gynecologists and Obstetricians) "a person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program fully recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery." Among the responsibilities of the midwife are supervision of pregnancy, labor, delivery, and puerperium. The midwife conducts the delivery independently, cares for the newborn, procures medical assistance when necessary, executes emergency measures as required, and may practice in a hospital, clinic, maternity home, or private home. The midwife, whose practice may also include well-child care, family planning, and some aspects of gynecology, is often an important source of health counseling in the community.
3 a nurse midwife or Certified Nurse Midwife.

midwife

Medspeak-UK
A trained health professional in the UK, typically female, who provides assistance and primary medical care to women throughout pregnancy, monitoring its course, attending labour and delivery, following the new mother for up to 28 days after birth, assisting with breast feeding, neonatal care and so on.

Medspeak-US
A formally trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth; midwifery is undergoing a resurgence in popularity in the US, as it provides obstetric services for lower-income women and is a delivery option chosen by some upper-income women who desire a greater involvement in childbirth.

midwife

Obstetrics A trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth or, in many situations, is the primary provider of obstetric care Salary $66K + 9% bonus. See Alternative birthing center, Alternative gynecology, Certified nurse midwife, Doula, Granny midwife, Lay midwife, Natural childbirth; Cf Lamaze technique.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
See also: doula

midwife,

n a woman who attends another woman during pregnancy and labor, an expert practitioner in the care of expectant women and the delivery of uncomplicated pregnancies.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.

midwife,

n 1. in traditional use, a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2. a nurse practitioner trained and experienced in assisting women in childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Being a midwife myself, I still felt part of the Association, even though the name wasn't in there, but I think including the midwives in the title is great.
Midwife shortages have a significant impact on the quality of care and the choices available to women, the report suggests.
REPORT A shortage of midwives can affect the quality of care CAUTION Midwife VIctoria Graham
Department of Education and the professional midwife has evidence of meeting established midwifery competencies that accord with a defined scope of practice corresponding to the components and extent of coursework and supervised clinical education completed, and
Whereas, this definition states that successful completion of a recognized midwifery educational program and acquisition of the applicable legal requirements in the country of practice are essential components for a midwife to be recognized for clinical practice, and
We can never plan for every eventuality - I know one midwife has been locked in a house and had a dog set on them,' Mrs Rogers explained.
Midwife Jenna Cunningham said: "We're just trying to make sure that women who will use the unit are as excited about it becoming midwife-led as we are.