midlevel provider


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms.
Related to midlevel provider: Physician Assistant

midlevel provider

n.
A medical provider who is not a physician but is licensed to examine and treat patients under the supervision of a physician.

midlevel provider

Managed care A health care provider–eg, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, etc, whose activities are directed and/or dictated by a supervising physician on whom liability for those activities rests
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Nonphysician providers are separated into (1) midlevel providers, which for our study are comprised of nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants, and (2) all other nonphysician providers, such as chiropractors, or physical and occupational therapists.
For example, in a remote clinic with an elderly patient complaining of intense abdominal pain accompanied by decreasing blood pressure, the midlevel provider who suspects an aortic aneurysm may immediately transport the patient to a hospital.
The majority of respondents, 59%, (n=258) believed a mid-level provider was needed in Oregon and 43% of those individuals (n=186) were personally interested in becoming a midlevel provider. (Table V) A significantly higher percentage (p<0.0001) of ADHA members (70%), those holding an expanded practice permit (71%), and those who believed their current scope of practice was limited (61%), were personally interested in becoming mid-level providers (Table VI).
The role of midlevel providers in abortion care in the United States.
Physicians are permitted to perform menstrual regulation up to 10 weeks' amenorrhea and midlevel providers (family welfare visitors or paramedics) up to eight weeks' amenorrhea.
regarding, but not limited to, patient access, ethical issues, third-party payer reimbursement, legislative impact, midlevel provider relationships and statutes, and continuity and quality of care." It also asked the board to develop a model for a retail health clinic that will ensure continuity of care and a medical home.
Although the symposium is geared toward practicing dermatologists, midlevel providers, medical students and residents, it is open to any health professional or person who works with the skin and hair of people of color, including hairstylists and aestheticians.
In some states, midlevel providers still must see patients face-to-face before providing telehealth care.
Crane's organization proposes another option--what it calls a "third option"--that would allow physician groups led by a primary care physician and midlevel providers operating at the top of their licenses to contract directly with CMS as so-called "clinically integrated organizations."
In Arizona, the precedent is to reimburse midlevel providers at a lower rate.
Fifty-four percent of women who presented for postabortion care were treated by physicians, and 46% were treated by midlevel providers (e.g., nurses and midwives).