midge

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midge

(midj),
The smallest of the biting flies, in the genus Culicoides; swarms may attack humans and other animals; vectors of filarial infections.
[O.E. mycg]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

midge

Any of a broad group of small, two-winged flies (order Diptera, of families Chironomidae and Ceratopogonidae), which are blood-sucking intermediate hosts for filarial worms—e.g., Mansonella perstans, M ozzardi and others.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

midge

(mij)
The smallest of the biting flies, in the genus Culicoides; swarms may attack humans and other animals; vectors of filarial infections.
[O.E. mycg]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

midge

(mĭj) [ME. migge]
Small, gnatlike flies including those from the families Chironomidae and Ceratopogonidae. Some cause painful bites.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Midges are much smaller than mosquitoes, weighing only about 1/8000 of a gram.
David said: "With ants and grasshoppers on menus across the world, Scotland has a ready supply of protein-filled midges.
Midges have been around since prehistoric times and most don't bite - but the Scots species Culicoides impunctatus does.
But there is little that can be done after the midges have been on the warpath.
In Kazakhstan, the study of bloodsucking midges was initiated in the 60s of the 20th century, mostly in the mountainous regions (Tien Shan and south-western Altai) [4].
"In Larnaca there are no mosquitoes but midges, and these two should not be mixed up as mosquitoes bite and midges don't.
The midge is a small, wingless fly that spends most of its two-year larval stage frozen in the Antarctic ice.
All midges were identified morphologically, but because female C.
A NEW insect repellant aimed at keeping the Schmallenberg-carrying Culicoides midge away from sheep, cattle, goats, horses and domestic animals has come on to the market.
Professor Butt said: "Now we are at looking at smart ways of using this fungus, trialling different lures to attract the adult midges to baits contaminated with fungal spores, which will maximise the kill rate, reduce the amount of fungus needed and be very precise in delivering it just to the target insect species."
A commercial fungal strain, V275, is already available and has been shown to kill up to 100% of adult midges and larvae.