middle ear

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middle ear

The middle of the three parts of the ear, consisting of an air-filled cavity bound externally by the tympanic membrane and containing three ossicles that vibrate in response to sound waves, passing the amplified sound to the inner ear at the round window.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tym·pan·ic cav·i·ty

(tim-pan'ik kav'i-tē) [TA]
An air chamber in the temporal bone containing the ossicles; it is lined with mucous membrane and is continuous with the auditory tube anteriorly and the tympanic antrum and mastoid air cells posteriorly.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
The organ of hearing: composed of the external ear, which includes the auricle and the external acoustic, or auditory, meatus; the middle ear, or the tympanic cavity with its ossicles; and the internal ear or inner ear, or labyrinth, which includes the semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea.
See also: auricle
Synonym(s): auris [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

middle ear

The narrow cleft within the temporal bone lying between the inside of the ear drum and the outer wall of the inner ear. The middle ear is lined with mucous membrane, contains the chain of three auditory OSSICLES and is drained into the back of the nose by the EUSTACHIAN TUBE. It is a common site of infection, which gains access by way of the tube. Middle ear infection is called OTITIS MEDIA. Also known as the tympanic cavity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

middle ear

see EAR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Middle ear

The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear. It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
Organ of hearing and equilibrium, composed of external ear,, consisting of auricle, external acoustic meatus, and tympanic membrane; middle ear,, or tympanic cavity, with its auditory ossicles and associated muscles; and internal ear,, the vestibulocochlear organ, which includes the bony labyrinth (of semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea), and vestibular and cochlear labyrinths.
Synonym(s): auris.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Its patch in the middle ear tends to flake off when infected.
The improvisational patch may explain why infections in this bald zone of the middle ear tend to be more severe and frequent than in cilia-covered stretches.
Before this paper, biologists thought the entire lining of the middle ear came from one kind of tissue, endoderm, which can readily form hairs.
By staining mouse tissue samples, the researchers revealed these labels and pieced together which parts of the middle ear came from each precursor cell type.
Symptoms of middle ear infection and disease can include pain, fever, vomiting, irritability, sleeplessness, change in personality, and decreased hearing.
However, an abnormal middle ear does not always mean infection is present.
The most common complication of middle ear disease is temporary hearing loss.
Some children persistently retain fluid in the middle ear cavity for weeks, months, or everyears.
The antibiotics are necessary to cure any infection present and to prevent a new infection from re -damaging the middle ear and reversing any progress already made.