middle ear

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middle ear

The middle of the three parts of the ear, consisting of an air-filled cavity bound externally by the tympanic membrane and containing three ossicles that vibrate in response to sound waves, passing the amplified sound to the inner ear at the round window.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tym·pan·ic cav·i·ty

(tim-pan'ik kav'i-tē) [TA]
An air chamber in the temporal bone containing the ossicles; it is lined with mucous membrane and is continuous with the auditory tube anteriorly and the tympanic antrum and mastoid air cells posteriorly.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
The organ of hearing: composed of the external ear, which includes the auricle and the external acoustic, or auditory, meatus; the middle ear, or the tympanic cavity with its ossicles; and the internal ear or inner ear, or labyrinth, which includes the semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea.
See also: auricle
Synonym(s): auris [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

middle ear

The narrow cleft within the temporal bone lying between the inside of the ear drum and the outer wall of the inner ear. The middle ear is lined with mucous membrane, contains the chain of three auditory OSSICLES and is drained into the back of the nose by the EUSTACHIAN TUBE. It is a common site of infection, which gains access by way of the tube. Middle ear infection is called OTITIS MEDIA. Also known as the tympanic cavity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

middle ear

see EAR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Middle ear

The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear. It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
Organ of hearing and equilibrium, composed of external ear,, consisting of auricle, external acoustic meatus, and tympanic membrane; middle ear,, or tympanic cavity, with its auditory ossicles and associated muscles; and internal ear,, the vestibulocochlear organ, which includes the bony labyrinth (of semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea), and vestibular and cochlear labyrinths.
Synonym(s): auris.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Computed tomography (CT) revealed a pervasive soft tissue shadow in the left middle ear cavity and thinning of the bony wall in front of the tympanic cavity (Figure 3a, b).
There may be associated extension into the IAC or middle ear cavity.
[1] The nondependent soft tissue in middle ear cavity, widening of aditus ad antrum with loss of its "figure of 8" appearance and expansion of the mastoid antrum by soft tissue favours the diagnosis of cholesteatoma.
However, considering the potential of surgery to impair hearing, recurrence caused by residual squamous epithelium in the middle ear cavity after conservative surgery, or even worse, a combination of these two unwanted effects, the importance of the preoperative radiological evaluation of cholesteatoma becomes evident.
In the cranial CT scan, a soft tissue density completely obliterating the left middle ear cavity and mastoid cells was observed and at this level, a bone defect in the posterior and superior walls of the mastoid bone and a lesion (35 x 33 x 34 mm) pushing the 4th ventricle in the left cerebellar hemisphere were detected.
An MR Angiography (Figure-1 and 2) was performed which showed an aneurysmal dilation of the right petrous ICA extending into the middle ear cavity with absent bony wall between the carotid canal and the middle ear.
Repeated CT scan of the temporal bones and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) revealed a bony sequestrum and defect in the anterior middle ear cavity and external auditory canal walls (Figure 2(a)).
However, a tan mass with neovascularization filled the posterior middle ear cavity and abutted the tympanic membrane (figure, A).
This increases the likelihood of bacteria migrating to the middle ear cavity and causing the AOM.
The middle ear cavity was filled with soft tissue density, and ossicles were not observed (Figure 2).
Computed tomography (CT) of temporal bone with 1 mm slice thickness showed a soft tissue mass in the right external auditory canal with bony remodeling, soft tissue in the mesotympanum, hypotympanum, and middle ear cavity extending into Prussak's space and minimal erosion of the scutum.
Computed tomography (CT) showed partial opacification of the left mastoid air cells and middle ear cavity and thickening of the left tympanic membrane and skin of the left EAC.