middle cranial fossa


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Related to middle cranial fossa: Posterior cranial fossa

mid·dle cra·ni·al fos·sa

[TA]
a butterfly-shaped portion of the internal base of the skull posterior to the sphenoidal ridges and limbus and anterior to the crests of the petrous part of the temporal bones and dorsum sellae; it lodges the temporal lobes of the brain in the lateral portions, and the hypophysis centrally.
Synonym(s): fossa cranii media [TA]

middle cranial fossa

An irregular depression in the middle of the inner surface of the base of the skull. which houses the temporal lobe of the brain laterally and the hypophysis at its centre. It consists of a central and two lateral portions. The middle cranial fossa is bounded anteriorly by the posterior margin of the lesser wings of the sphenoid bones and the anterior margin of the sulcus chiasmatis, and posteriorly by the superior margins of the petrous parts of the temporal bones and dorsum sellae of the sphenoid bone; laterally, the middle cranial fossa merges with the lateral wall  of the skull on either side. The floor of the middle cranial fossa is comprised of the body and greater wings of the sphenoid bone and the anterior surfaces of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.

middle cranial fossa

The middle one-third of the floor of the cranial cavity; it is deeper and wider than the anterior cranial fossa. The middle cranial fossa is formed from the posterior two thirds of the sphenoid bones (the greater wings, the dorsum sella, and the clinoid processes) and the petrous and squamous portions of the temporal bones. The middle cranial fossa contains the superior orbital fissures, optic canals, foramina rotundum, foramina ovale, foramina spinosum, and foramina lacerum. The temporal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres, the optic chiasm, the hypophysis (pituitary), internal carotid arteries, circle of Willis, and cavernous sinuses lie in the middle cranial fossa.
See also: fossa
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2003, Sennaroglu and Slattery reported a high correlation between anatomic and computed tomography (CT) measurements in the middle cranial fossa anatomy in 10 temporal bones.
Using the middle cranial fossa approach to access the IAC requires in-depth knowledge of the anatomy of the temporal bone, petrous apex and, of course, the middle cranial fossa.
As previously mentioned, Sennaroglu and Slattery studied the correlation between anatomic and CT measurements in the middle cranial fossa anatomy in 10 temporal bones.
We advocate routinely obtaining a preoperative CT scan for all patients who are scheduled to undergo surgery via a middle cranial fossa approach.
Most previous efforts to delineate the anatomy of the middle cranial fossa have involved only a small number of temporal bones.
When data from our study and those of others are used together, surgeons can safely and rapidly locate the IAC and other vital structures when performing surgery via the middle cranial fossa approach.
Surgical exposure of the internal auditory canal and its contents through the middle cranial fossa.
In this article, we report a case of multiloculated arachnoid cyst that originated in the middle cranial fossa and extended into the sphenoid and ethmoid paranasal sinuses, causing substantial skull base erosion.
MRI confirmed the presence of an extra-axial cystic lesion in the sphenoid sinus that extended to the floor of the middle cranial fossa (figure 1, B and C).
18) Arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa have also been documented to cause local bulging and thinning of the temporal bone and erosion of the sphenoid bone in the context of elevated intracranial pressure.