watt

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watt

 (W) [wot]
the SI unit of power, being the work done at the rate of 1 joule per second. In electric power, it is equivalent to a current of 1 ampere under a pressure of 1 volt.

watt (W),

(waht),
The SI unit of electrical power; the power available when the current is 1 ampere and the electromotive force is 1 volt; equal to 1 joule (107 ergs) per second or 1 voltampere.
[James Watt, Scot. engineer, 1736-1819]

watt

(W) (waht)
The SI unit of electrical power; the power available when the current is 1 ampere and the electromotive force is 1 volt; equal to 1 joule (107 ergs) per second or 1 voltampere.
[James Watt, Scot. engineer, 1736-1819]

watt

(W) (waht)
The SI unit of electrical power.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bluetooth Low Energy SoCs are being designed to operate with microwatt active power and microwatt-level average power in low duty cycle applications.
Such a cell with cross-sectional area of 0.25 square millimeters can provide 15.7 microwatts (solar mass is equal to 1.71, 8.3 percent efficiency).
"If we did, the limits would be at 1, or 0.5, or 0.1 (microwatts per square centimeter)."
Grossman, Thermal transfer measurements at microwatt power levels, in Digest Conf.
Lutron's Intelligent Fluorescent Lighting Management System, microWATT features microprocessor-based design and internal programmed logic.
It measures both average power and the time structure of the power in modulation form over a range from 1 microwatt to 90 milliwatts (647 nm).
One cockroach produces one-tenth of a microwatt at 0.2 volt.
The spectrometer is available with interchangeable filters, which together with the variable shutter speed, allows easy and accurate measurements from any type of source, from fractions of a microwatt to watts in intensity.
In charge-coupled devices, commonly used in videocameras, even 1 microwatt of energy distorted the video signal.
Four years ago, they broke through the microwatt barrier and into the milliwatt regime.
Standby power requirements for ICs such as real-time clocks (RTCs), static random access memories (SRAMs) and microcontrollers (MCUs) are now below a microWatt as newer, lower-power products are introduced.
The sleep mode involves not only powering down the microcontroller to microwatt levels (a standard feature of the microcontroller), but also turning off a significant portion of the internal circuitry (including drive to the sampler).