microtubule

(redirected from microtubular)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

microtubule

 [mi″kro-tu´būl]
any of the slender, tubular structures, composed chiefly of tubulin, found in the cytoplasmic ground substance of nearly all cells; they are involved in maintenance of cell shape and in the movements of organelles and inclusions, and form the spindle fibers of mitosis.

mi·cro·tu·bule

(mī'krō-tū'byūl),
A hollow, cylindric cytoplasmic element, 25 nm in diameter and of variable length, that occurs widely in the cytoskeleton, cilia, and flagella of cells; microtubules play a role in the maintenance of cell shape and increase in number during mitosis and meiosis, in which they are related to movement of the chromosomes by the nuclear spindle.

microtubule

/mi·cro·tu·bule/ (mi″kro-too´būl) any of the slender, tubular structures composed chiefly of tubulin, found in the cytoplasmic ground substance of nearly all cells; they are involved in maintenance of cell shape and in the movements of organelles and inclusions, and form the spindle fibers of mitosis.
Enlarge picture
Microtubules in a 9 + 2 array in a cross-section of the axoneme of a cilium.

microtubule

(mī′krō-to͞o′byo͞ol, -tyo͞o-)
n.
Any of the cylindrical hollow tubulin-containing structures that are found in the cytoplasm, cilia, and flagella of eukaryotic cells and are involved in determining cell shape and structure and directing the movement of organelles and chromosomes. Microtubules, along with microfilaments and intermediate filaments, make up a cell's cytoskeleton.

mi′cro·tu′bu·lar adj.

microtubule

a hollow cylindrical structure (200 to 300 angstroms in diameter and of variable length) that occurs widely within plant and animal cells. Microtubules increase in number during cell division and are associated with the movement of deoxyribonucleic acid material. Compare microfilament.

microtubule

A cylindrical tube measuring 20–25 nm in diameter, composed of protofilaments which are in turn composed of alpha- and beta-tubulin polymers. Each microtubule is polarised: at one end (the negative (-) end), alpha-subunits are exposed; at the other end (the positive (+) end), beta-subunits are exposed. Microtubules act as a scaffolding to determine cell shape, and provide a matrix on which cell organelles and vesicles move, a process requiring motor proteins, including kinesin (which moves towards the (+) end of the microtubule) and dynein (which generally moves towards the (-) end). Microtubules also form the spindle fibres for separating chromosomes during mitosis.

mi·cro·tu·bule

(mī'krō-tū'byūl)
A cylindric cytoplasmic element that occurs widely in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells; microtubules increase in number during mitosis and meiosis, where they may be related to movement of the chromosomes or chromatids on the nuclear spindle during nuclear division.

microtubule

or

neurotubule

a hollow filament about 20–25 nm in diameter found in EUKARYOTE cells, composed of ACTIN-like protein called tubulin. Microtubules are thought to make up the CYTOSKELETON of the cell, the spindle fibres of MEIOSIS and MITOSIS, (See also COLCHICINE and, in some cells of plants and animals, form the 9 + 2 structure of the CILIUM and FLAGELLUM.

mi·cro·tu·bule

(mī'krō-tū'byūl)
A cylindric cytoplasmic element that occurs widely in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells; microtubules increase in number during mitosis and meiosis.

microtubule

any of the slender, tubular structures composed chiefly of tubulin, found in the cytoplasmic ground substance of nearly all cells; they are involved in maintenance of cell shape and in the movements of organelles and inclusions, and form the spindle fibers of mitosis.

microtubule-associated protein (MAP)
any of the high molecular weight proteins that bind to microtubules, enhancing polymerization.
microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase
a protein kinase that is activated in response to cell stimulation by many different growth factors and that mediates cellular responses by phosphorylating specific transcription factors and other target proteins.
microtubule organizing center (MTOC)
the location in a cell from which microtubules regrow after depolymerization. See also centrosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Se clasificaron como degenerados los ovocitos que presentaron citoplasma contraido, ausencia de material nuclear y de estructura microtubular (FIG.
Se han identificado varios genes ligados a liscencefalia en humanos fuera de PLA2G7, y uno de ellos es el gen DCX, el cual esta ligado al cromosoma X, que codifica una proteina denominada como doublecortin, la cual es una proteina homodimerizante al parecer asociada al citoesqueleto microtubular neuronal de celulas en migracion.
A reduction in energy-dependent amino acid transport by microtubular inhibitors in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.
El mercurio organico es muy danino para el sistema neurologico, pues al precipitar las proteinas afecta el sistema de transporte microtubular de la neurona.
It is caused by the lack of dynein arms that is normally link microtubular doublets (Afzelius et al.
Cross section of the cilia showed "9+2" microtubular structure of approximately 200 nm in diameter (Fig.
2+] and where possible impediments to the kink motion, polymerization, and microtubular caps are taken into account.
Vitamin manufacturers who have been considering the use of microtubular halloysite as an ingestible product have also approached the company.
Microtubular cytoskeleton and organelles during sporogenesis of the homosporous fern Ophioglossum vulgatum.
El hecho de que el transporte reticulopodial de particulas sea afectado por colchicina, mas no por citochalasina, en el grupo de algas ameboides estudiadas, sugiere que este podria ser dependiente del citoesqueleto microtubular, como ocurre en Allogromia laticollaris (Travis & Bowser, 1986a; 1986b ) y Astrammina rara (Bowser et al.
In general, flagella and cilia of eukaryotes show an axoneme composed of a 9 + 2 microtubular pattern.
Pictures of living cells infected with HIV were taken under a microscope at intervals as short as 15 seconds, creating a movie of the viruses' activities as they traversed the microtubular highway toward their destination in the nucleus.