microtropia

mi·cro·tro·pi·a

(mī'krō-trō'pē-ă),
Strabismus of less than 4 degrees, associated with amblyopia, eccentric fixation, or anomalous retinal correspondence.
[micro- + G. tropē, a turn, turning]

microsquint

A small-angle heterotropia, usually 10 dioptres or less, which, whilst associated with defective binocular function, cannot be treated. Microsquint is often associated with anisometropia; both predispose children to amblyopia. Children with microsquint are prescribed eyeglasses if they are anisometropic. Long-term follow-up is advised to detect and treat early amblyopia.

microtropia

(mī″krō-trō′pē-ă) [″ + trope, a turning]
Strabismus with very small deviation, usually less than 4°.

microtropia

A small-angled (usually less than 6-8 Χ in angle) inconspicuous strabismus which is not usually detected by cover test, either because the deviation is too small or because the angles of abnormal retinal correspondence and eccentric fixation coincide with the angle of deviation. There is usually amblyopia in the deviated eye and there may also be anisometropia. The patient with this condition displays nearly normal binocular vision without symptoms. Management usually consists of correcting the refractive error. Syn. microsquint; microstrabismus; small angle strabismus. See four prism dioptre base out test.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is possible for a decompensated fully accommodative esotropia or decompensated microtropia to result in the patient losing their binocular function.
compared contrast sensitivity in the rehabilitated (with occlusion therapy) amblyopic eyes and normal fellow eyes of patients with amblyopia due to microtropia or anisometropia.
All the cases were either diagnosed as esotropia without optical correction or diagnosed as esotropia, esophoria, microtropia, or eccentric fixation; they all received proper optical corrections.
Factors that influence laterality in determination of amblyopia include microtropia, sighting dominance, developmental or neurological factors and laterality in the development of refractive error.
Objectives: To assess and compare contrast sensitivity function in the previously amblyopic and non-amblyopic "normal" eyes of patients with microtropia and anisometropia who achieved 20/20 visual acuity after occlusion therapy.
Keywords: Contrast sensitivity, amblyopia, microtropia, anisometropia
The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in contrast sensitivity between the amblyopic and normal eyes of patients with microtropia and anisometropia that were adequately rehabilitated with occlusion therapy.
This was in agreement with published literature and was influenced by factors that included microtropia, sighting dominance, developmental or neurological factors, laterality in the development of refractive error.
Differential diagnosis of epicanthus can be quite difficult, especially since an intermittent esotropia or microtropia also might be present.
Microtropia is usually defined as a strabismus where the angle of deviation is less than 10[DELTA].
This means that it is important to detect strabismus, particularly microtropia, in cases of suspected anisometropic amblyopia.
A cover test on an 8-year-old child patient revealed a right microtropia of approximately 6[DELTA] size.