microsurgery

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microsurgery

 [mi″kro-ser´jer-e]
dissection of minute structures under the microscope with the use of extremely small instruments. With increasingly sophisticated operating microscopes surgeons are able to perform tissue transfers without the cumbersome standard transfer procedures, such as the tubed pedicle graft and cross-leg flap, that were once necessary to ensure adequate blood supply to the grafted part. Microvascular surgery permits anastomosis of peripheral blood vessels less than 2 mm in diameter. Similarly, microneural techniques allow the surgeon to reestablish sensation by repairing or replacing severed and damaged peripheral nerves. Because of the advances in microsurgery, it is possible to reattach amputated parts, provided the health status of the patient and the condition of the amputated part are favorable.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē),
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power (7x to 15x) operating microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, and scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels, nerves or other structures. While it is primarily used in plastic surgery, microsurgical techniques are being incorporated into most other fields of surgery and may become linked with robotic surgery.

microsurgery

Surgery A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power–7x to 15x microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels or nerves or other structures. See Free flap microsurgery, Laryngeal microsurgery.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

Surgery in which the operation field is magnified 2 to about 40 times by means of an operating microscope. Appropriately miniaturized operating instruments are used. This method allows a high degree of precision in the cutting, approximation and stitching (suturing) of small parts and is widely used by ophthalmologists, ENT surgeons and vascular surgeons. To a lesser extent, microsurgery is employed in gynaecology and urology.

Microsurgery

Surgery on small body structures or cells performed with the aid of a microscope and other specialized instruments.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benefits of microsurgery over traditional surgery; the increasing number of surgeries amongst the geriatric population & growing popularity of plastic and reconstructive surgeries; and the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, lifestyle disorders, and cancer are the key factors driving the growth of the microsurgical instruments market.
Spectacularly successful microsurgical penile replantation in an assaulted patient: One case report.
In "dry" microsurgical training, simulation models simulating biological tissues created from various materials are used.
With microsurgical robotic devices, patients can be treated remotely, especially those who live in parts of the world where special surgical procedures are not otherwise readily accessible.
There has been a discussion with regards to the superiority of either microsurgical or endoscopic methods for the treatment of colloid cysts.1,2,5,6 The endoscopic approach requires a smaller opening and corticotomy, and arguably, offers much better visualization.
Documentation of microsurgical anatomy of the middle cerebral artery is not very common in Indian literature.
Operating loupes (x3 magnification) and microsurgical instruments were used in all cases.
All the patients were operated under G.A., after taking informed consent, in prone position followed by Laminectomy, durotomy, myelotomy, microsurgical resection of tumour, and closure of wound.
A pooled estimate from the two RCTs regarding sub-epithelial connective tissue grafts (SCTG) showed significant achievement in complete root coverage in the microsurgical group [relative risk (RR):1.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12 to 2.36; P=0.01] with acceptable heterogeneity.
(3) Cohen and Tamai described the first microsurgical repair technique in 1977; it has been the preferred method of repair since, including venous and arterial anastomoses.
consultant plastic surgeon and lead for microsurgical services at Morriston Hospital, Amar Ghattaura, is the only trained supermicrosurgeon in Wales.