microstreaming

microstreaming

(mi?kro-strem'ing)
The flow of interstitial fluids, or the pulsation of tissue particles associated with the application of therapeutic ultrasound. In physical medicine, microstreaming can promote soft-tissue healing. In dentistry, it is used in the removal of plaque and scale. See: cavitation
References in periodicals archive ?
(34,35) These results might be ascribed to the acoustic microstreaming produced along the instrument by the ultrasonic device, leading to formation of irrigating jets, directed towards the root canal wall.
In addition, faculty report assigning treatment sections according to hard deposit with no consideration given to the technology's microstreaming and cavitational effects on biofilm or treatment of inflammation.
In addition, microstreaming is produced at the interfaces because of high-intensity airborne ultrasound, which reduces the diffusion boundary layer.
The powerful stirring effect of ultrasound is mainly due to the microstreaming caused by the oscillations of numerous resonant bubbles before they collapse.
Finally, because the dependence upon peak power density suggests that acoustic pressure plays a significant role, they speculated it is possible that stable cavitation and the accompanying microstreaming contribute to the bioacoustic effect.
The non-thermal effects of ultrasound, including cavitation and acoustic microstreaming, may be more important in the management of soft tissue lesions and adhesion prevention than thermal effects [102].
This great extraction efficiency by ultrasonic treatment is mainly attributed to its mechanical effects (including microjetting and microstreaming), which promote targeted compounds to move from the sample matrix into the solvent.
Acoustic microstreaming, the unidirectional movement of fluids along cell membranes, occurs as a result of the mechanical pressure changes within the ultrasound field.
125 A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR BLOOD SEPARATION AND CELL MORPHOLOGY ANALYSIS USING ACOUSTIC MICROSTREAMING AND HYDRODYNAMIC PRINCIPLES
As with traditional therapeutic US, the 2 mechanisms by which noncontact low-frequency US is proposed to facilitate wound healing are cavitation and acoustic microstreaming. These nonthermal effects impact the cellular biological processes that aid in wound healing.
Microbubbles agitated by the same mechanism of cavitation and microstreaming can cause localized mechanical stress on the adjacent clot.
Additionally, PUA creates cavitation and acoustic microstreaming but sonic energy produces only acoustic microstreaming [24] leading to less removal of debris from the canal walls and which in turn may cause less apical extrusion [25].