microsampling

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microsampling

(mī′krō-sam″pling) [ micro- + sampling]
Performing a laboratory analysis on a very small amount of blood or tissue.
microsample (mī′krō-sam″pĕl)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Choosing to microsample is a delicate balance between regulatory acceptance and doing the right thing from a 3Rs perspective, but still worthy of consideration.
Researchers have also improved microsample measurements from the data analytics side.
Robyt, "Miniaturization of three carbohydrate analyses using a microsample plate reader," Analytical Biochemistry, vol.
In order to identify the appropriate preadoption state characteristics for inclusion in our model, we use data from the 1900 Public Use Microsample (PUMS) and the 1901 Statistical Abstract of the United States.
A microsample of blood, collected via fingerstick, would be loaded into a disposable cartridge and analyzed, and results would be sent to a secure database.
The CLIA-certified system can run multiple tests from a single "microsample" of blood, often provided via finger stick instead of taking a vial of blood for each test.
IntegenX, a privately-held company, designs and makes automation systems, which enable reliable microsample preparation and analysis for the life sciences.
The unique contribution of this paper is the bringing together of various administrative data that provides detailed mother and child information for the population of women giving birth in Georgia between 1994 and 2002, geographic information related to where the mothers live through the Public Use Microsample of the Census, and detailed pre- and post-birth employment experience of the mothers as well as detailed information about the women's employers.
The data for this analysis come from the 1980 Census 5% Public Use Microsample. The sample is restricted to white males who were born between 1933 and 1942 in the United States (and subsequently were teenagers in the late 1940s and the 1950s and age 37 to 46 in 1980), were a salary or wage earner, had positive earnings and weeks worked in the previous year, and did not have any allocated values for any variable used in the analysis.
Additional strategies to prevent iatrogenic blood loss in the ICU included ordering only essential laboratory tests and using microsample analysers for all diagnostic laboratory testing.