microradiography


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

microradiography

 [mi″kro-ra″de-og´rah-fe]
radiography under conditions that permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph up to several hundred linear magnifications.

mi·cro·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(mī'krō-rā'dē-og'ră-fē),
Making radiographs of histologic sections of tissue for enlargement.
See also: historadiography.

microradiography

/mi·cro·ra·di·og·ra·phy/ (mi″kro-ra″de-og´rah-fe) radiography under conditions which permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph up to several hundred linear magnifications.

mi·cro·ra·di·og·ra·phy

(mī'krō-rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Making radiographs of histologic sections of tissue for enlargement.

microradiography

(mī´krōrād´ēog´rəfē),
n a process by which a radiograph of a small or very thin object is produced on fine-grained photographic film under conditions that permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph within the resolution limits of the photographic emulsion, which approaches 1000 lines/mm.

microradiography

radiography under conditions that permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph up to several hundred linear magnifications.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: caries; dentin; enamel; erosion; mineral density; mineralization: x-ray microradiography.
Contact x-ray microradiography is the primary tool used by researchers to evaluate the mineral density of dental hard tissues [1], This "gold standard" is particularly important as research regarding changes in mineral density is critical to understanding and preventing (or reversing) human caries: the most prevalent curable disease worldwide [2].
Ultimately, x-ray microradiography is the only current method that determines mineral density directly (via attenuation of x-ray energy by the mineral), and as such it has long been known as the "gold standard" for mineral density measurements [1, 3-7, 10].
However, the x-ray sensitive film previously used for contact microradiography has been discontinued and has been out of production for several years.
Overall, VRP-M film was found well-suited to the needs of x-ray microradiography and will likely serve as the film of choice until digital x-ray detectors reach a spectral resolution acceptable for research use.
Harless, Comparison of Artificial White Spots by Microradiography and Polarized Light Microscopy, J.
Carey, Updated Method for Contact X-ray Microradiography, J.
Shozo Takagi (1978-present) Calcium phosphate biomaterials, prevention of dental caries, quantitative digitized microradiography, single crystal and powder x-ray crystallography.
Comparison of artificial caries: like lesions by quantitative microradiography and microhardness profiles.
Microradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy applied to enamel lesions formed in vivo with and without fluoride varnish treatment.
After the films were developed, quantitative microradiography was used to assess the mineral content of the lesions.