micropsia

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micropsia

 [mi-krop´se-ah]
a disorder of visual perception in which objects appear smaller than their actual size.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·crop·si·a

(mī-krop'sē-ă),
Perception of objects as smaller than they are.
[micro- + G. opsis, sight]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

micropsia

The visual perception that objects are smaller than they actually are, which may be due to:
(1) Optical distortion caused by lenses, corneal swelling, retinal oedema, macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy and other ocular conditions;
(2) Neurologic disorders, such traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and migraines;
(3) Drugs (either legal or illicit, including hallucinogens); or
(4) Psychological factors (e.g., Alice in Wonderland syndrome).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·crop·si·a

, micropsy (mī-krop'sē-ă, mīkrop-sē)
Perception of objects as smaller than they are.
[micro- + G. opsis, sight]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

micropsia

Perception of objects as much smaller than they in fact are. This may be caused by an abnormal separation of the cones of the centre of the retina (so that widely-spaced points on the image are interpreted by the brain as being closer together) or may be a hallucination from drugs or disorders of brain function.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

micropsia

Anomaly of visual perception in which objects appear smaller than they actually are. It may be due to a retinal disease in which the visual cells are spread apart, or to paresis of accommodation or to uncorrected presbyopia, or to the recent wear of either base-out prisms or a correction for myopia, etc. See dysmegalopsia; macropsia; metamorphopsia.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann