micropsia


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Related to micropsia: teleopsia

micropsia

 [mi-krop´se-ah]
a disorder of visual perception in which objects appear smaller than their actual size.

mi·crop·si·a

(mī-krop'sē-ă),
Perception of objects as smaller than they are.
[micro- + G. opsis, sight]

micropsia

/mi·crop·sia/ (mi-krop´se-ah) a visual disorder in which objects appear smaller than their actual size.

micropsia

[mīkrop′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + opsis, sight
a condition of vision in which a person perceives objects as smaller than they really are. It may occur during seizure activity. See also hallucination. microptic, adj.

micropsia

The visual perception that objects are smaller than they actually are, which may be due to:
(1) Optical distortion caused by lenses, corneal swelling, retinal oedema, macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy and other ocular conditions;
(2) Neurologic disorders, such traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and migraines;
(3) Drugs (either legal or illicit, including hallucinogens); or
(4) Psychological factors (e.g., Alice in Wonderland syndrome).

mi·crop·si·a

, micropsy (mī-krop'sē-ă, mīkrop-sē)
Perception of objects as smaller than they are.
[micro- + G. opsis, sight]

micropsia

Perception of objects as much smaller than they in fact are. This may be caused by an abnormal separation of the cones of the centre of the retina (so that widely-spaced points on the image are interpreted by the brain as being closer together) or may be a hallucination from drugs or disorders of brain function.

micropsia

Anomaly of visual perception in which objects appear smaller than they actually are. It may be due to a retinal disease in which the visual cells are spread apart, or to paresis of accommodation or to uncorrected presbyopia, or to the recent wear of either base-out prisms or a correction for myopia, etc. See dysmegalopsia; macropsia; metamorphopsia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seeing objects smaller than they are: micropsia following right temporoparietal infarction.
98) that causes the micropsia cited by Roscoe (1987a, 1987b), not misaccommodation.
If the effects of micropsia - whatever the cause - are of concern with a HUD focused at optical infinity, then a focal distance of 2.
The extra accommodation could be the mechanism by which the reported distance misperception occurred because it could have led to accommodative micropsia.
Size-distance perception and accommodation-convergence micropsia - A critique.
Size-distance paradox with accommodative micropsia.
Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy present with diminution of vision, metamorphopsia, relative central scotoma, micropsia, dyschromatopsia and blurring of vision.
Inclusion criteria of the patients were a history of sudden central vision loss, metamorphopsia, micropsia, characteristic ring reflex on indirect ophthalmoscopy and a characteristic leakage pattern on fundus fluorescein angiography.
A 35-year-old patient attended for an eye examination complaining of a recent grey spot in his central vision and occasional micropsia.
Criteria for inclusion of patients in the study were those having history of central visual loss with foggy vision, micropsia, metamorphopsia, and a demonstrable ring reflex on ophthalmoscopy.
Fewer patients complained of metamorphopsia (34%), micropsia (7%) while a negligible (4%) of patients had complaints of either eye ache or head ache.