microparasite


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Related to microparasite: Macroparasite

mi·cro·par·a·site

(mī'krō-par'ă-sīt),
A parasitic microorganism.

microparasite

An older term for a microorganism invisible to the naked eye that completes its full life cycle within one host, often intracellularly, and is transmissible to a conspecific host. Microparasite is little used in the working biomedical parlance.

Examples
Salmonella, HIV.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this model, the microparasite transmission is assumed via a mass action process, the fecundity of uninfected host is density-dependent, and the fecundity of infected host may be reduced due to being infected compared with that of uninfected host.
Our work lends support to the hypothesis [4] that helminth infection has a protective effect on concurrent microparasite infections via modulated host immunity.
In this work, we propose a general, although very sketchy, model that considers a great deal of the aspects related to the dynamics of mosquito-borne microparasites. From the equilibrium analysis, we calculated the prevalence of the infection in the host populations, from which the number of infected vectors was deduced.
burgdorferi were host specialized, the strains of this microparasite would migrate differentially, resulting in geographic structuring of this pathogen.
The critical factors that determine the level of virulence in these models are the rates of increase of the microparasite within a host and, more often, the rates of transmission of the parasite to new hosts.
Antia, "Within-host population dynamics and the evolution of microparasites in a heterogeneous host population," Evolution, vol.
Aggregation and distribution of strains in microparasites. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci.
magna may interact with other pathogens such as brainworm (Parela-phostronglyus tenuis), Echinococccus spp., and bacterial and viral microparasites. Various helminths have been implicated in immune suppression (Maizels et al.
In order to understand how six microparasites regulate Daphnia populations and drive the populations to extinction, Ebert et al.
helminths), which change host demography and may interact directly with microparasites via the host s immune system.