microneurography


Also found in: Wikipedia.

microneurography

[-nyoo͡rog′rəfē]
the recording of impulse conduction in individual nerve fibers by means of a microelectrode. The technique is used in studies of the relationship between body mass and the sympathetic nervous system.

microneurography

An experimental technique in which tungsten microelectrodes are inserted into sympathetic nerve fascicles, allowing direct recording of peripheral sympathetic nerve traffic to the skeletal muscle vascular bed.
References in periodicals archive ?
1982) Kinaesthetic role of muscle afferents in man, studied by tendon vibration and microneurography.
For many years, several techniques have been developed for the assessment of ANS: (a) dosage of plasmatic and urinary catecholamines (Goldstein 1983), which nowadays is not considered as a highly reliable index of sympathetic activity (Montano 2009), (b) muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a direct but invasive recording of sympathetic activity using a microneurography technique (Wallin 2007), (c) analysis of HRV, a non-invasive tool able to provide reliable information on the sympathetic and parasympathetic oscillations of the heart period and arterial pressure time series, (d) more recent non-linear approaches based on entropy-derived measures and symbolic analysis of heart period time series.
2001), by means of the microneurography of the peroneal nerve, and high levels of circulating catecholamines found in these patients as observed by La Rovere et al.
Microneurography has made recording of single Ad-fibre and C fibre activity possible, and provides a direct method for measuring sympathetic activity.
However, without sufficient physiological evidence from receptor isolation techniques, such as microneurography, the possibility of an increase in the discharge of these receptors cannot be discounted.
Strikingly, OSA patients continue to have repetitive bursts of sympathetic activity and increased sympathetic activity even during the day (9), as demonstrated by microneurography and elevated catecholamine levels both in plasma and urine.
The researchers used a technique called microneurography to examine a group of healthy subjects.
Leah Bent is one of few researchers in Canada with an expertise in microneurography.
Their blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity as recorded by peroneal microneurography were measured before and after repeated 4-minute mental stress tests.
Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was obtained via microneurography, as described previously (Tamisier et al.
Tan from the Cardiovascular Research Laboratory (Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA) for his help with microneurography data analysis.