micrometastatic

mi·cro·met·a·stat·ic

(mī'krō-met'ă-stat'ik),
Denoting or characterized by micrometastasis, as in micrometastatic disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mi·cro·met·a·stat·ic

(mī'krō-met'ă-stat'ik)
Denoting or characterized by micrometastasis, as in micrometastatic disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
The test has been validated in ER-positive, HER2-negative, lymph node-negative or micrometastatic patients and allows for predicting which patients would derive minimal or no benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and may be safely spared from it, thus avoiding toxicity and cost, without compromising outcomes (13).
There is increasing evidence that many small, nonmetastatic or micrometastatic cancers are Dr H.
Two-thirds of our patients presented with a locally advanced breast cancer (stage 2a 3c) with disease in both the breast and axilla, with a high risk of systemic micrometastatic disease.
Oral field cancerization: carcinogen-induced independent events or micrometastatic deposits?
However, based on the premise that CTCs could be shed not only from tumor masses but also from premalignant lesions, micrometastatic foci, and reservoirs of dormant cancer cells, information obtained from the genomic interrogation of these disparate CTC subsets have the potential to unravel the complete clonal hierarchy of neoplastic cells.
The potential advantages of perioperative therapy include treatment of possible micrometastatic disease, testing of the biological behavior of the tumor (patients with early progression on chemotherapy might be spared subsequent morbid surgery), and possible facilitation of the surgical resection.
The mechanism behind this benefit remains unclear but may result from inhibiting progression of metastatic disease, preventing additional metastatic seeding, or through an immunostimulatory abscopal effect on micrometastatic disease.
There is now emerging evidence that a subset of patients, categorized as borderline resectable (BR), may benefit from resection after neoadjuvant therapy due to the theoretical benefits of downstaging the tumor, treating subclinical micrometastatic disease, increasing the proportion of patients who will receive and complete therapy, and the ability to better monitor the tumor's response to therapy [5, 6].
Micrometastatic disease with local T cell response can explain our findings as well.
[9], who see metastases at the time of implantation as a contraindication, but it must be taken into account that only 10-20% of patients have macroscopic evidence of metastatic disease, whereas 80-90% of patients with osteosarcoma are assumed to have micrometastatic disease at initial diagnosis [19].