micrometastasis


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Related to micrometastasis: micrometastases, micrometastatic

mi·cro·me·tas·ta·sis

(mī'krō-mĕ-tas'tă-sis),
A stage of metastasis when the secondary tumors are too small to be clinically detected, as in micrometastatic disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

micrometastasis

Surgical pathology A metastatic CA identified only by histologic examination; micrometastases are detectable by neither physical exam nor imaging techniques
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mi·cro·me·tas·ta·sis

, pl. micrometasteses (mī'krō-mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz)
A stage of metastasis when the secondary tumors are too small to be clinically detected, as in micrometastatic disease.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The threshold used for the 2 datasets was slightly different because the case mixes were different (eg, macrometastasis versus micrometastasis; Table 1).
(3) Tumor cell dissemination, also referred to as micrometastasis, can be seen in bone marrow in roughly one third of the patients with breast cancer.
Naume et al., "A pooled analysis of bone marrow micrometastasis in breast cancer," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
However, "microscopic" only means that the disease is in a different moment in time, but it is still the same disease, and so, one can decide at which moment to intervene in the natural evolution of the disease, be it at a later stage (large lymph nodes), or earlier stage (micrometastasis).
However, before the surgical procedure, chemotherapy is given for 10 weeks to better demarcate tumor margins, shrink tumor size, and combat micrometastasis. After the chemotherapy protocol has been completed, an above-the-knee amputation is performed.
Migration of tumor cells by saliva (micrometastasis) [Figure 1b].
Micrometastasis condition required chemotherapy to kill the primary neoplasm and hidden micrometastasis cells before it gets spread and it can be detected by physical examination or x-rays and the success of breast cancer treatment can be measured after 5-years.
The term micrometastasis has been replaced by "clinically occult disease" as detected by SLNB.
This technique frequently identifies isolated tumor cells and micrometastasis (collectively called low-volume disease) in addition to macrometastasis.
In the other three cases, SNs were negative for the presence of micrometastasis, as demonstrated by both multi-dissection and IHC analyses.