microlivestock

microlivestock

Animals (e.g., cows, pigs, sheep) that are much smaller than standard breeds of livestock, which adapt to various environments, breed easily and survive on diverse or marginal food supplies (such as garbage).
References in periodicals archive ?
Microlivestock: Little-known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future.
Goats are considered small livestock animals compared to bigger animals such as cattle camels and horses but larger than microlivestock such as poultry rabbits cavies and bees.
Microlivestock: Little Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington DC., USA.
The AGR which is an omnivorous nocturnal rodent has been marked as Africa's second most hunted microlivestock [1] and have evolved many locomotive features adapted for its survival [1,2]; it is observed to easily curl up to bite or escape, jump, and climb high walls and great agility (personal observation).
[2.] NRC (National Research Council) Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1991.
Native of Central and South America animals, such as the rodents, paca Agouti paca, capybara Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris and agouti Dasyprocta sp., have potential for increase microlivestock production, since they represent the main protein sources for local populations (Bonaudo et al.
Microlivestock: little known animals with a promising economic future.
Microlivestock. Little-known small animals with a promising economic future.
Breeding microlivestock - smaller animals not traditionally used as livestock - could be the solution.
But tiny, "user-friendly" species - called "microlivestock" - could become a major food source in developing countries.
There are two types of microlivestock. One consists of extremely small forms of conventional livestock - such as cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs.