microinvasive carcinoma

mi·cro·in·va·sive car·ci·no·ma

a variety of carcinoma seen most frequently in the uterine cervix, in which carcinoma in situ of squamous epithelium, on the surface or replacing the lining of glands, is accompanied by small collections of abnormal epithelial cells that infiltrate a very short distance into the stroma; this represents the earliest stage of invasion.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

microinvasive carcinoma

A superficially invasive epithelial malignancy; if you must ask, it usually isn't Uterine cervix Stage Ia carcinoma A squamous cell carcinoma–SCC that penetrates < 5 mm from the base of the epithelium or < 7 mm in horizontal spread; anything larger is Stage Ib; cervical MC has > 95% 5-yr survival; lymph nodes are involved in ±1% of MCs Vulva A SCC measuring < 2 cm in diameter, and < 5 mm stromal invasion; 5% have lymph node metastases Treatment Vulvectomy, lymph node excision if involved. See Carcinoma in situ.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mi·cro·in·va·sive car·ci·no·ma

(mīkrō-in-vāsiv kahrsi-nōmă)
Lesion seen most frequently in the uterine cervix, in which carcinoma in situ of squamous epithelium, on the surface or replacing the lining of glands, is accompanied by small collections of abnormal epithelial cells that infiltrate a very short distance into the stroma.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(a) Excluding the 36 cases of microinvasive carcinoma. Table 3.
Demographic and clinical findings comparing two patient groups Group 1 Group 2 P Age (years; median) 41-75 (60) 38-82 (65) Follow-up (months; median) 1-72 (24) 4-86 (28.5) Cordectomy types Type 1 6 (16%) 4 (5%) Type 2 15 (39%) 26 (29%) 0.046 Type 3 7 (18%) 21 (24%) Type 4 - 9 (10%) Type 5 10 (26%) 28 (32%) T category Tis 7 (18%) 4 (5%) 0.045 T1a 23 (60%) 66 (75%) T1b 8 (21%) 18 (20%) Pathological diagnosis Carcinoma in situ 7 (%18) 7 (8%) 0.259 Microinvasive carcinoma 3 (8%) 9 (10%) Invasive carcinoma 28 (74%) 72 (82%) Positive surgical margin 1/38 (3%) 3/88 (3%) 1.00 Local recurrence 2/38 (5%) 17/88 (19%) 0.024 Recurrence after type 5a 2/10 (20%) 6/28 (21%) 1.00 cordectomy Table 2.
Colposcopic findings: 28 (11.4%) cases were CIN I, 50 (20.4%) cases were CIN II, 150 (61.2%) cases were CIN III, 13 (5.3%) cases were microinvasive carcinoma and four (1.6%) cases were CIS.
Follow-up study of 232 patients with stage Ia1 and 411 patients with stage Ia2 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (microinvasive carcinoma).
Microinvasive carcinoma of the breast is among the most commonly misdiagnosed breast disease entities.
In the case of microinvasive carcinoma. stage 1aq1, the pregnancy can continue through treatment by cold-knife cone.
In the case of microinvasive carcinoma, stage 1aq1, the pregnancy can continue through treatment by cold-knife cone.
Upon further examination, microlaryngoscopy revealed a coexisting superficial irregular lesion on the upper surface of the left vocal fold, which was identified as a microinvasive carcinoma. This unusual presentation emphasizes the importance of a microlaryngoscopic examination.
The colposcopic evaluation was VAIN III, possible microinvasive carcinoma.
In our case, because the [SUV.sub.max] value was 6.71, a value indicating malignancy, we preferred to perform a histopathological investigation to exclude a microinvasive carcinoma accompanying RE (9).
Cytokeratin markers may be helpful in highlighting the presence of malignant cells of a microinvasive carcinoma ([less than or equal to] 1 mm) arising in a background of DCIS.
2 patients of CIN I shifted to CIN II, out of 23 patient of CIN II in cytology, 2 shifted to CIN III and 1 patient of CIN II shifted to microinvasive carcinoma, now 22 patients shows CIN II features.