microinfarct


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microinfarct

 [mi″kro-in´fahrkt]
a very small infarct due to obstruction of circulation in capillaries, arterioles, or small arteries.

microinfarct

/mi·cro·in·farct/ (-in´fahrkt) a very small infarct due to obstruction of circulation in capillaries, arterioles, or small arteries.

microinfarct

A very small INFARCT. Microinfarcts become important when multiple.

microinfarct

a very small infarct due to obstruction of circulation in capillaries, arterioles or small arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
T[degrees]e insportance of microinfarcts as a physical sign should riot be underestimated.
Microbleed and microinfarct detection in amyloid angiopathy: A high-resolution mri-histopathology study.
This has been attributed mainly to the ability of serum troponins to detect microinfarcts, areas of necrosis too small to produce electrocardiographic changes or increased serum cardiac enzymes.
Furthermore, the small-vessel diseases such as microinfarcts, white matter lesions, and lacunes caused by microembolisms due to plaque rupture and subsequent silent stroke provide us new ideas about the mechanisms.
Increased number of microinfarcts in Alzheimer disease at 7-T MR imaging.
Prolonged hyperinsulinemia, as found in these aforementioned metabolic states, is believed to cause endothelia proliferation, capillary narrowing, and microinfarcts (Taylor & MacQueen, 2007).
It is conceivable that [cerebral amyloid angiopathy], which is commonly seen in patients with AD and is associated with parenchymal amyloid, may lead to ischemic vascular events in the brain like [white-matter hyperintensities], microinfarcts, and [microbleeds].
It might be related to microemboli shedding from the vascular plaque and causing microinfarcts, or to decreased blood flow and oxygenation to the brain, Dr.
The most common irreversible dementias are AD, vascular brain injury usually caused by cerebral microinfarcts "mini-strokes", and Lewy body dementia, which produces visual hallucinations, deficits in attention and concentration, and Parkinsonian symptoms.
Additional mechanisms and risk factors for osteopenia in SCD include delayed puberty and low accrual of peak bone mass, bone microinfarcts resulting from repeated sickle crises, chronic illness with immobilization, and calcium, vitamin D, and other nutritional deficiencies (35), (36).
These included two distinct types of brain lesion: those indicating Alzheimer's disease, and lesions called microinfarcts, usually attributed to tiny, multiple, unrecognized strokes.
The high flow and pressure pulsations in fragile microvasculature and increased energy loss can result in microhemorrhages and microinfarcts in these organs (8, 21, 22).