micrographia


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Related to micrographia: Parkinson's disease, festinating gait

micrographia

/mi·cro·graph·ia/ (mi″kro-graf´e-ah) tiny handwriting, or handwriting that decreases in size from normal to minute, seen in parkinsonism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Hooke's meticulous illustration of a flea from his book Micrographia foretold a new chapter in natural history, where organisms could be classified according to detailed descriptions of their anatomy.
As the book progresses, the word becomes increasingly more limiting so that it can almost seem to "discipline" the poetic, much as Micrographia is said to do in developing its own "uninterrupted chain" of association (173).
In the introduction to Micrographia, Hooke wrote about the importance of instruments (5):
Anos despues, Sir Robert Hooke reprodujo en su Micrographia (1665) la primera imagen observada de la estructura regular de una delgada lamina de corcho, cuyos elementos bautizo celulas, termino indispensable hoy en dia para referirse a los atributos estructurales de los tejidos biologicos.
In his book Micrographia (1665), the physicist Robert Hooke (1635-1703) described how a cork is composed of a pattern of tiny rectangular holes that he called "cells.
It can include micrographia, hypomimia, hypophonia as well as decreased blink rate.
Benjamin Martin in Micrographia Nova (1745) speaks of the magnified "Fibres" of the eye, an eye that possesses a "Crystalline Humour," and Martin calls attention to the "fine Expansion of the Optic Nerve," the retina, with its "Branchery of Blood Vessels," which "above all" presents "the finest Entertainment to the Microscopic Observer" (page 24).
The lower limits of micrographia are determined only by the ability of a scribe to manipulate the point of a pen, and insertion of one line after another into the space between two pre-existing lines of text is governed only by a principle of elasticity, not strict decorum.
The large print attached at the end of Hooke's Micrographia, his famous representation of a flea, does not strike us as physically alien, because its shape is known to us from naked-eye observations.