microform

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Related to microforms: microfilm, microfiche

microform

(mī′krō-fŏrm″) [″ + ″]
An incomplete or minor expression of a trait or illness.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From 1930 to 1980, while agencies, companies and archives were creating tons of microfilm media, there was not a general recognition that microforms required storage in a low-temperature, low-humidity environment for long term preservation.
That physical form can be paper or a microform (film or fiche).
Microform market place 1990-1991: an international directory of micropublishing.
In essence, he argues that the crisis is not with paper-based books and other similar publications, but with the long-term archival longevity of microform and digital copies.
ProQuest's President and CEO, Joe Reynolds, noting that his company manufactured two CD-ROMs containing disputed articles, but stopped selling them after the Second Circuit of Appeals ruled for the freelancers, said "We are disappointed by the Court's ruling with respect to electronic databases, but are pleased by the Court's discussions regarding the non-infringing nature of microform editions of periodicals.
Libraries have adapted to storage on paper, microform, and audiovisual formats within our collections.
The Microfilm Shop has its own lab to offer processing and duplicating services for a range of microforms.
aaaa aaaaa Other spaces open to the public are devoted to magazines, posters, stamps, postal cards, digital documents, microforms, and printed papers in addition to a multimedia space.
library) and Barkley (government information and microforms, U.
The law corrects a glaring anomaly in current federal rules that prohibits I-9s from being stored electronically but requires them to be kept in either paper form or on microforms.
Given that many adjunct faculty hold advanced degrees and publish, they benefit just as much as full-time instructors from librarian assistance in learning about updates and search strategies on library databases and electronic resources, the condition of microforms and manuscripts, microform readers themselves, and indexes and catalogs.