microfibril


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to microfibril: microfibrillar

microfibril

 [mi″kro-fi´bril]
an extremely small fibril.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·fi·bril

(mī'krō-fī'bril),
A very small fibril having an average diameter of 13 nm; it may be a bundle of still smaller elements, the microfilaments.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

microfibril

An extremely thin fibril, or fibre-like strand, which is identifiable only by electron microscopy, and typically composed of glycoproteins and cellulose (for plants) or fibrillin (for animals).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·fi·bril

(mī'krō-fī'bril)
A very small fibril having an average diameter of 13 nm; it may be a bundle of still smaller microfilaments.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

microfibril

a group of some two thousand cellulose chains massed together in the CELL WALL. Microfibrils are embedded in an organic matrix giving the cell wall great strength.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
At the center of the model is a microfibril (MF) composed of a two-by-two array of elementary fibrils.
With the enzymatic hydrolysis proceeding, the fiber surface was markedly rough and aggregated microfibrils due to layer-by-layer action.
Microfibrils, as the main structural component of aortic wall ECM, provide a scaffold for the lysyl oxidase protein family to cross-link tropoelastin monomers to form mature elastic fibres [8].
Wood quality is also largely affected by its mechanical properties, which are determined by the orientation of cellulose microfibrils in secondary cell wall, and mechanical strength [4].
Resolution provided by the SEM shows that concentric microfibrils compose the pit border (Figure 11).
Microtubule-mediated control of microfibril deposition: a re-examination of the hypothesis.
One possible answer came from Lynn Sakai and coworkers in 1986, when they discovered the major protein of the microfibril. Sakai named this protein fibrillin.
It occurs frequently in polyurethanes, since the urethane groups have the interactivity and the spatial configuration to generate the aggregation of functional groups to form a kind of microfibril whose modulus of elasticity is considerably greater than the most flexible part of the molecule (e.g., polyethyleneglycol).
A hypothesis is presented where the combination of a thin cell wall and large microfibril angle are responsible for the superior properties exhibited by the DN 30 pulp.
It is characterized by shorter cells, larger microfibril angles, more compression wood, different specific gravity and higher lignin content (Zobel and van Buijtenen, 1989).
Eleven protofibrils form a microfibril which bundle together into macrofibrils and fill each hair cell.
Collectively, relationships between cell expansion and husk leaf development and function could be speculated as follows: assuming that a certain amount of polysaccharides is required for expansion of a cell, during rapid husk leaf expansion before silking, matrix polysaccharides like hemicellulose and cellulose as well as microfibril cellulose increase, causing the husk leaf to expand.