microdiskectomy

microdiskectomy

 [mi″kro-dis-kek´tah-me]
debulking of a herniated disk using an operating microscope or loupe for magnification.

microdiskectomy

/mi·cro·dis·kec·to·my/ (mi″kro-dis-kek´tah-me) debulking of a herniated nucleus pulposus using an operating microscope or loupe for magnification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tubular diskectomy vs conventional microdiskectomy for sciatica: a randomized controlled trial.
Hatton, "Appropriateness of antibiotic selection and use in laminectomy and microdiskectomy, " American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, vol.
In another study, 122 patients randomly received either 21 sessions with a chiropractor or a single surgery called microdiskectomy.
54,55) McMorland et al (2010) endorsed manipulation as a first-line treatment when compared to microdiskectomy for the treatment of sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation.
A study in the July 8 Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that a minimally invasive procedure known as tubular diskectomy, believed to offer a faster recovery, does not provide significant differences in improvements compared to conventional microdiskectomy for treating sciatica (spine-related leg pain).
Currently, open diskectomy and microdiskectomy (both involving removal of disk material through an incision) are used for treating the herniated disk.
Patients in the surgery group underwent microdiskectomy within an average of 2 weeks, while those in the conservative therapy group received pain medications from their primary care physicians, encouragement about the condition's favorable prognosis, and physical therapy if indicated.
The term lumbar spihal surgery, for the purposes of this article, includes procedures such as microdiskectomy, laminotomy, and laminectomy, which are used for a variety of nonmalignant-related diseases of the lumbar spine.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Children with herniated spinal disks fared better after microdiskectomy, compared with conservative management, in a study of 52 patients treated from 2000 to 2004.
8, p: 576-584), researchers concluded that spinal manipulation was just as effective as microdiskectomy for patients struggling with sciatica secondary to lumbar disk herniation (LDH).