microcirculation

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Related to microcirculatory: capillary bed

microcirculation

 [mi″kro-ser″ku-la´shun]
the flow of blood through the microvasculature. adj., adj microcir´culatory.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·cir·cu·la·tion

(mī'krō-sĭr'kyū-lā'shŭn),
Passage of blood in the smallest vessels, namely arterioles, capillaries, and venules.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

microcirculation

(mī′krō-sûr-kyə-lā′shən)
n.
The flow of blood or lymph through the smallest vessels of the body, as the venules, capillaries, and arterioles.

mi′cro·cir′cu·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

microcirculation

The circulation of blood at the terminal arterioles, capillaries and small venules.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

microcirculation

The circulation of blood at the terminal arterioles, capillaries, small venules
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mi·cro·cir·cu·la·tion

(mī'krō-sĭr-kyū-lā'shŭn)
Passage of blood in the smallest vessels, namely arterioles, capillaries, and venules.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Microcirculation

The passage of blood in the smallest blood vessels of the body, such as the capillaries in the hand and fingers.
Mentioned in: Trigger Finger
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·cir·cu·la·tion

(mī'krō-sĭ­r-kyū-lā'shŭn)
Passage of blood in the smallest vessels, namely arterioles, capillaries, and venules.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The degree to which vasopressors are helpful or harmful to cerebral microcirculatory support and the dysynchrony between cerebral and peripheral microcirculatory impact requires further study.
Coronary heart disease in smokers: vitamin C restores coronary microcirculatory function.
Our results suggest PI, AUC and HA-HVTT can be used to accurately and quantitatively assess blood flow velocity and volume, and the time of hepatic microvascular perfusion, and thus effectively evaluate the hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction of I/R injury.
A hallmark of sepsis is an early onset of microcirculatory dysfunction.
Microcirculatory studies showed normal capillary density before (74/[mm.sup.2], reference value: 40.4-85.6/[mm.sup.2]) and after (109 [mm.sup.2], reference value: 69.5-117.1/[mm.sup.2]) venous congestion [11].
Dysfunction of the endothelium of microcirculatory vessels, most often, is the basis in the pathogenesis of reducing microcirculatory blood flow in the bones [2], which, in turn, leads to a disturbance of osteogenesis, thereby causing osteoporotic changes in bone tissue [3].
Smoking tobacco, microcirculatory changes and the role of nicotine.
Heparin administration has been suggested to have a positive influence on lung, liver, kidney, colon, and stomach microcirculatory disturbances accompanying experimental caerulin-induced acute pancreatitis [22].
More recently, possible roles of catecholamine and histamine-mediated cellular ischemia and microcirculatory dysfunction have also been proposed [15,16].
In the treatment group, at four weeks, microcirculatory and clinical evaluations indicated a decrease in skin flux (P<0.05) at the surface of the foot, a finding diagnostic of an improvement in microangiopathy, the flux being generally increased in patients affected by diabetic microangiopathy.