microbe


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Related to microbe: archaea, Archæa

microbe

 [mi´krōb]
a microorganism, especially a pathogenic one such as a bacterium, protozoan, or fungus. adj., adj micro´bial, micro´bic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·crobe

(mī'krōb),
Any minute organism. As originated, the word was intended as a collective term for the large variety of microorganisms then known in the 19th century; modern usage has retained the original collective meaning but expanded it to include both microscopic and ultramicroscopic organisms (spirochetes, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses). These organisms are considered to form a biologically distinctive group, in that the genetic material is not surrounded by a nuclear membrane, and mitosis does not occur during replication.
[Fr., fr. G. mikros, small, + bios, life]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

microbe

(mī′krōb′)
n.
A minute life form; a microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease. Not in technical use.

mi·cro′bi·al (mī-krō′bē-əl), mi·cro′bic (-krō′bĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

microbe

A microscopic living organism—e.g., bacterium, fungus, protozoan; microorganism.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

microbe

 A teensy-weensy organism–eg, bacterium, fungus, protozoan; bug
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mi·crobe

(mī'krōb)
Any minute organism, including both microscopic and ultramicroscopic organisms (spirochetes, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses). These organisms are considered to form a biologically distinctive group, in that the genetic material is not surrounded by a nuclear membrane and mitosis does not occur during replication.
[Fr., fr. G. mikros, small, + bios, life]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

microbe

Any microscopic organism but especially a bacterium or virus capable of causing disease. The word is almost synonymous with, but slightly upmarket from, the term ‘germ’.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

microbe

see MICROORGANISM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

microbe

Any very minute living organism, such as bacteria, protozoa, fungi or viruses.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Microbes live on every part of the human body, from inside your mouth to between your toes (see Meet the Body Bugs, page 5).
After four generations (that would be your great-grandchildren), no length of time on a high-fiber diet could recover the microbes that break down fiber.
If they are not eating microbes directly, people already eat food that has been created through the work of microbes.
Microbe populations might also change with the seasons, says Caroline De Tender, a marine microbiologist at the Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research in Merelbeke, Belgium.
The findings of the research could present a non-invasive way to screen for the disorder, Luo said, because this microbe may be present only in negligible amounts in healthy, young children.
Sharp's newly developed sensor takes in air from the measuring area, extracts the microbes that need to be detected, and uses Sharp's proprietary version of the fluorescent detection method(2) to automatically measure the amount of the microbes-all in approximately 10 minutes(3).
She began consulting on fermentation and wine microbe identification and management with Vinotec Chile in Santiago in 2000, and in 2004 with Vin Lab in Stellenbosch, South Africa.
Although having a legion of invisible critters crawling all over your body may sound gross, many of these microbes perform jobs vital to your survival.
Parkes, a geomicrobiologist at Cardiff University in Wales, led the new study of microbes and minerals.
This chemical is then broken down by microbes into dimethyl sulfide, a volatile substance that enters the atmosphere and is converted by sunlight into sulfate granules that are just the right size to nucleate water vapor.
As detectives, students will learn to track down mischievous microbes This site provides a great introduction to microbes.