microanalysis

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microanalysis

 [mi″kro-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
the chemical analysis of minute quantities of material.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mi·cro·a·nal·y·sis

(mī'krō-ă-nal'i-sis),
Analytic techniques involving unusually small samples.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mi·cro·a·nal·y·sis

(mī'krō-ă-nal'i-sis)
Analytic techniques involving unusually small samples.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(2006): In situ fractional crystallization of a mafic pluton: Microanalytical study of a Palaeogene gabbronorite plug in East Greenland.
Microsimulation in turn is also classified as microanalytical simulation (Petersen, 1992).
A 2 MeV proton beam was used to excite X-rays in thick standard samples (acquired from Geller Microanalytical Laboratory, Inc.) of single and multielement composition of energy range from 1.25 keV to 25 keV.
Elemental analyses were carried out by the Microanalytical Research Center Faculty of Science Cairo University.
Total protein of lyophilized crystalline style preparations was estimated from the total nitrogen content determined on a CHN analyzer by the Campbell Microanalytical Laboratory, University of Otago.
Therefore, in order to study the socialization process, we have to perform microanalytical studies of the social interaction in the newsroom involving both novices and experts, analysing language use and its social entailments in this particular community of practice (Cotter 2010).
Microanalytical data were recorded on a Perkin-Elmer 2400 Series II C, H, N analyzer.
Carbonhydrogen-nitrogen analyses of polymers were carried out by a microanalytical technique using an Elementar Vario EL 3 elemental analyzer.
The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen contents of the prepared polymer were carried out in the microanalytical laboratory at Cairo University by using oxygen flask combustion and a dosimat E415 titrator (Switzerland).
Visit uoyetag.uoregon.edu or call 541-346-3084 to learn more about the writing lab that will bring together authors, publishers and writers, a day of science that includes a tour of UO's CAMCOR microanalytical facility, and language arts offerings.