microanalysis

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microanalysis

 [mi″kro-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
the chemical analysis of minute quantities of material.

mi·cro·a·nal·y·sis

(mī'krō-ă-nal'i-sis),
Analytic techniques involving unusually small samples.

mi·cro·a·nal·y·sis

(mī'krō-ă-nal'i-sis)
Analytic techniques involving unusually small samples.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the microanalytic approach, studies combining experimental and correlational designs, have shown that some variables such as processing skill or efficiency and strategy use that can affect WM span scores do not contribute to the correlations between WM span and higher level cognition (Conway & Engle, 1996; Engle, Cantor, & Carullo, 1992; Turley-Ames & Whitfield, 2003).
Differences in self-regulatory processes among students studying science: A microanalytic investigation.
They apply microanalytic discourse analysis and narrative theory to investigate how these narratives are interactively created in conflict talk episodes at the utterance level, and also consider how participants construct theories of responsibility, self-identity and other-identity, and positioning.
To unveil those discursive practices, Judith Baxter (2003) proposes a layered analysis that includes a microanalytic descriptive level and an interpretative level.
To most readers, this claim is nothing new, but in Law, Information Rules, and Economic Performance Svetozar Pejovich delves deeply into the microanalytic details of the incentive effects that arise from formal and informal institutions and into how they must mesh to produce preferred outcomes.
Comparing self-regulatory processes among novice, non-expert, and expert volleyball players: A microanalytic study.
A comparison of a global and microanalytic coding system: Implication for the future trends in studying interactions.
Besides these two main samples we have been conducting several intensive case-studies, which allow us to investigate change processes at a more microanalytic level.
For example, studies may utilize randomized clinical trials methodology, or may utilize other methods such as single--case, within--subjects, historical control, microanalytic change process and other designs.
The purpose of the current investigation was to establish the validity of microanalytic measures used to assess students' self-regulation of an academic science task, not only in terms of immediate achievement, but also in terms of a well-established "person" measure of self-regulated learning.
In addition to the social and emotional baggage of "reward," it is increasingly difficult to convey its intended meaning at increasingly microanalytic levels.