miasmatic disease

miasmatic disease

An obsolete, nonspecific term for any manifestation of malaria.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a visceral public uninitiated into technical health expertise, a miasmatic disease explanation largely makes sense because it can be sensed via sight and smell, specifically.
Typhoid fever and Zika offer two additional cases to examine how public health imperatives are viscerally marked by the blurring of the disciplinary boundaries between bacterial and miasmatic disease logics.
Specifically, they framed typhoid as a miasmatic disease wafting through the city's public spaces.
Nosode--a nosode must be obtainable from the miasmatic disease.
Yet as the novel continues, and the Crew of Light begin their destruction of Dracula's London refuges, there is a return to the representation of vampirism as a miasmatic disease once again, even if by this time it is a response to miasma that recognizes the existence of the microbe within the offensive organic matter that characterizes Dracula's presence.
(41) Anticontagionist arguments created a negative reputation for localities in the yellow fever zone, but simultaneously fostered a belief that permanent residence in such areas would result in immunity to miasmatic disease. The Southeastern lowlands were pestilent places, but residents could survive the onslaught of miasms if they resolved to stay in their vicinity.
Yellow fever and other miasmatic diseases made physicians' jobs complex and, sometimes, futile.
Medical historian Todd Savitt has suggested that roughly 30-40% of the enslaved and free black population in nineteenth-century America had one or more of these genetic conditions, passed them on to their children, and acquired other immunities to miasmatic diseases during their lifetimes.