miasma

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miasma

[mī·az′mə]
Etymology: Gk, miainein, defilement
an unwholesome, polluted atmosphere or environment, such as a marsh or swamp containing rotting organic matter. Also called miasm [mī′əzəm] .

miasma

noxious exhalations from putrescent organic matter; the basis for an early concept of the origin of epidemics.
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The closeness of Miss Rosa's study and the dust motes suggest that this is an ideal breeding ground for fever, according to miasmatic ideas about the origins and spread of disease.
A moment's reflection makes clear the consequences of the miasmatic theory of disease for how people thought about drinking water.
When Huck appears for the first time ever he might be memorably protruding a dead cat (anecdotal cure for warts, re-categorized in the present volume as a weapon of miasmatic mob-vengeance), but he is generally less than enthusiastic about various representatives of the wild and lower orders of creation, dead or alive.
And this in turn raises the interesting possibility that her master narrative of race and rape, her miasmatic plantation of the collective cultural mind, could now be said to function as a folktale, a "classic" whose endless iterations rely on subtle formal shifts to body forth the lessons of its archetypically static content.
Yellow fever and other miasmatic diseases made physicians' jobs complex and, sometimes, futile.
Lest one be tempted to dismiss this as "just one more silly but harmless emanation from the ever more loony academy," MacDonald says that this view is taken very seriously by government health agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health, which fund the academic proponents of the new miasmatic theory.
An Advanced One Week Program in Clinical and Comparative Materia Medica; Practical Implementation of Organon and Miasmatic Approach of Prescribing
Replacing miasmatic theory, in which disease had been associated with a place, germ theory shifted the blame to people, to human carriers, individually responsible for the spread of contagious diseases.
All that was solid about a woman who killed her child melted: "As sure as she would disappear into the miasmatic air of Southern slavery, [she] was evaporating into the thin air of Northern texts written to memorialize her" (p.
He says: "I take the miasmatic approach which classifies people according to their symptoms.
from the depths of which bubbles of miasmatic gas constantly arise and give forth a stench unendurable even on the bridge forty or fifty feet above the surface of the stream.