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Related to metrical: Metrical romance

metric

 [met´rik]
1. pertaining to measures or measurement.
2. having the meter as a basis.
metric system the system of units of measurement that is based on the meter, gram, and liter and in which new units are formed from the basic terms by prefixes denoting multiplication by a power of ten. See also si units.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

met·ric

(met'rik),
Quantitative; relating to measurement. See: metric system.
[G. metrikos, fr. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

met·ric

(met'rik)
Quantitative; relating to measurement.
See: metric system
[G. metrikos, fr. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The conclusion is straightforward: we need neither a rule like the C-NSR, nor the additional concepts of metrical sisterhood or metrical invisibility for an explanation of the relevant data in German.
Stripped of thematic content and reduced to a peculiarly Scottish metrical form, the song doesn't have a semantic meaning so much as a national identity--it isn't read so much as recognized.
The Faith We Sing has included an updated version of this metrical psalm adapted by Thomas H.
Throughout the six chapters of his monograph, Weiskott alternates metrical analysis with the study of poetic style.
According to Cornelius, three modes stand out in the metrical continuum of the alliterative tradition, which may be roughly centered at Beowulf, Lawman's Brut, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Based on the language, a foot is either unbounded where the parameters of the metrical foot is the whole phonological word, or bounded where the stress should "fall within a particular distance from a boundary or another stress" (Hayes 1995: 32).
Supposing that meter meant "mechanically measured temporal units in tension with the fluid, intuitive whole," the free-verse modernists "did not fully understand either what it was or what they were doing in trying to overthrow it." In Steele's poetry, Wilson sees a literary artist who transcends this modernist dualism by showing that "metrical poetry not only does not inhibit, but operates fluently in, colloquial and heightened diction alike." In the versatile fluency of meter in Steele's poetry, Wilson finds evidence that meter is not an inauthentic human artifice obscuring natural realities.
Fraser writes that a "succession of lines of the same metrical pattern, a succession of iambic pentameters, for instance, is rather like the succession of waves breaking on the shore.
This is not to suggest that the poem is metrical, only that a metrical structure accommodates the rhythms (but not the accents) found there.
Robert Stewart reports that the volume Zaburaur Git (Psalms and Hymns) was used largely for this purpose, with metrical versions prepared by various Christian missions.
Prosodic instability allows Robert Burns to intervene by including incongruous, unscannable Gaelic refrains that "link to a tradition of metrical dissonance" (207) and resist the pathos-laden narrative through which Scottish ballads are made to enter "the emergent world order of Anglo-American modernity" (211).
Foreshadowing subsequent themes in the following chapters, Avrutin deals with the first comprehensive attempt under Nicholas I (1825-55) to compile more accurate population statistics through the application of modern metrical techniques.