metonymy

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metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
References in periodicals archive ?
The main lines of research so far have investigated different types of metonymies, their relation to the compound constituents and to the overall meaning of the compound, and their interaction with conceptual metaphors.
He does this in part because his new adjusted toolbox defines each rhetorical figure not as the narrow trope (for example, of kinaya) identified by the Classical Arabic critic, but rather as an expanded field that includes a scope envisaged for French poetry by Moreau (metonymie).
b) Target-in-source metonymies are those in which the target is a subdomain of the source, for example the metonymies based on Kovecses and Radden's part-for-part relationship and those based on other frames like the product and the location frames (1998), e.g.
The advertisement's meaning is retrievable from an intricate complex of interacting metaphors and metonymies, operating both within the visual and multimodal spaces.
The original denotative meaning of IMF as a monetary organization lost its meaning to other myths that were created through metonymies. The life of the acronym as a sign with various signifiers depicts the general psychology of the Korean people who were struggling to deal with the social crisis.
In the case of humorous metonymies, the prototypical, default process of understanding is interfered, as the reference points are marked and non-salient, and reference point structures deformed.
These metonymies of the ear, strangely echoing and displacing both Constructivist metonymies of the hand and Surrealist metonymies of the foot, not only demarcated Genzken's departure from her preoccupation with sinuous organic forms in her sculpture but also responded to the increasingly reactionary resuscitation of photographic portraiture by her peers.
Findings reveal that the practitioners and academics relied on similar metaphors (including the Conduit Metaphor), metonymies, and constructed scenarios.
Unlike the two novels previously discussed, however, the metaphors and metonymies in Rodoreda's novel are more tentative, often approaching cliches, and the mirror images more refracted, to give voice to the protagonist's search for significance in her life and in herself.
My efforts to depict the way in which O'Brien represents the experience of extreme events in terms of the loss of the paradigmatic dimension of language, for example, run alongside Saul Friedlander's remarks on the use of 'minute incidents' in accounts of the Holocaust to convey 'the excess that cannot yet be put into phrases'.[31] O'Brien's metonymies and ellipses must in part be seen as evidence of the argument that only a language 'purged of all metaphor, trope, and figuration' is appropriate for the recounting of traumatic events.[32] I have mainly avoided the term 'trauma' because the concept has tended to carry with it the very assumptions about the relation between the literal and the figurative that I have been attempting to question.
(19.) The anal metonymies at work in the entire new porch/constipation chapter are manifold.
The six essays in part 3 discuss mathematical reasoning and analogy, and the five essays in part 4 discuss reasoning and metaphors, metonymies (figures of speech), and images.