metonymy

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Related to metonymic: synecdoche, metonymy

metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
References in periodicals archive ?
In tfub-parde, the head tfub 'wood' stands for the object (rod, even though it is usually made of metal nowadays) and creates a metonymic link to the referent of MATERIAL FOR ENTITY.
U potpoglavlju Is all suffixation metonymic autor se ponovno vraca kritici Jandina rada koju otvara u trecemu poglavlju.
In the metonymic phase, "abstraction becomes possible" as "subject and object are becoming more consistently separated" (GC 7).
His action of ripping off the ribbons--at once a metonymic image of physical wounds and a metaphoric image of pain and suffering --emphasizes not only the disintegration of the body but also the disintegration of national identity.
The case from the beginning held metonymic qualities regarding a long history of historical injustices such that Sanford residents felt they had to contact the NAACP and other national news outlets, which sparked a social media firestorm that brought the case to national prominence (Myers, 2012).
Burning City takes very seriously this injunction against scrubbing or sanitizing "metonymic associations," insisting like few anthologies before it on vanguard poetries as intricate and international networks of coincidences and contiguities organized around music halls and cabarets, matinee icons, late night libations, telephony and telegraphy, postcards, and Baedecker guides.
As Maria Tymoczko argues in her Translation in a Postcolonial Context, this metonymic aspect of any given translation process becomes quite distinctive when one thinks of translations from a non-canonical literature to a canonical literature.
The reason for this is to be found in the fact that the noun email, which is the means of conveying the message, is itself metonymic for 'a message sent by email' and the action of sending can have either a dative or a ditransitive construction (He sent me the message/He sent the message to me).
In "Specimen Days" Whitman said of ferries, "I have always had a passion for ferries; to me they afford inimitable, streaming, never-failing, living poems." What ferries apparently do is afford a certain kind of poem via a certain kind of motion--"streaming" as a metonymic motion across a local space or at least a selected, representative perceptual inventory of that space, a catalogic in which each set member--tide, wake, barge, flag, foundry--contributes to the dissolution of actual place but in so doing convenes a commons not only immaterial but atemporal or transhistorical, allowing access to a placeless place at any time.
The description is based on empirical research, in the course of which I followed this metonymic phrase across different platforms and media: these include sixteen newspaper reviews of Layla (including the Finnish news agency that distributes its texts digitally in different media), the advertising campaign of the book, thirty literary blogs as well as the information given about the book on the webpages of nine popular Finnish online retailers of books and on its publisher's webpage.
Simultaneously, after Bill Ashcroft (On Post-Colonial Futures, Continuum, 2001), she also discusses the way the untranslatable travels through the texts in the shape of 'metonymic gaps', which enables cultural difference to be 'installed in the text in various ways' (citing Ashcroft 2001: 75).