metonymy

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metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The recurring messages are metonyms as well as exempla of the most ordinary, mundane traits of written communication (Woolf 1923, 92).
Sanders, who had been considered too radical for middle-class Americans, emerged on the national political scene as a metonym for the will of the "99%" and broad suspicion of "corporate America" in the aftermath of the Occupy movement (Kazin, 2016).
The hotel room in Rome is a metonym of the world, first as an ancient theatre, where spatial action opens a way to cathartic healing.
This can be viewed as a dislocation of the symbolic in his unconsciousness, that is, 'metonym'.
Toward understanding this section, let's pose the following example": [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] kaei0rou ra:ma:del keder / is a metonym of hospitality and generosity.
Even if we consider the voices in these pages as doorways into still further landscapes, each serving as a kind of experiential metonym, we find ourselves holding a small cup of blood, a small bright cup of tears, overflowing from the downpour of one century into another.
16 ( ANI ): Scotland Yard, a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police (Met), wants to downgrade the importance of written English tests at police recruitment centres to make it easier for candidates from ethnic minorities to join the department.
A famous metonymic exchange is reported to have taken place between the industrialist Henry Ford and his factory superintendent, who advised Ford that there was such demand for cars that he "would have to hire more hands." Ford, who recognized a metonym when he heard one, was reported to have said: "I don't mind hiring more hands; it's the rest of them I don't want." When it comes to elders, there are classic metonyms in use that prime or stimulate certain response tendencies in us.
The word "brand" is often used as a metonym, referring to the company that is strongly identified with a brand.
And this is the second metonym: such impassive muses are not creatures for all time; they too must confront mortality.
Among their topics are Muslim pilgrims at Marian shrines, how Pharping people manage an exclusivist response to the procession of Vajrayogini, ritual polytropy in China, the Ghriba on the Island of Jerba or the re-invention of a shared shrine as a metonym for a multicultural Tunisia, and new ancestral shrines after the Cold War.
On this world's microcosmic level, Hugo becomes a metonym of the Channel Islands, severed from France and cast into the sea by an ancient geological cataclysm.