reincarnation

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reincarnation

(rē-ĭn-kăr-nā′shŭn) [″ + incarnation]
1. The belief held by members of some religious groups that a person returns in physical or spiritual form to live again after death.
2. A renewal of interest in an old or previously discarded idea.
3. A psychological or spiritual reawakening of someone who had previously been engaged in a wholly different set of activities or interests.
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of metempsychosis. In his brilliant discussion of the ring structure in
He points to passages about bodily transformations (gilgul) in Hebraic texts and likens them to the Greek seer's belief in metempsychosis. Reading the occult books of Kabbalah, Mirandola was startled "to hear Pythagoras and Plato, whose principles are so closely related to the Christian faith." (40) Curiosity about Jewish Kabbalah also ran high alongside interest in Pythagoras amongst some Elizabethan Puritans.
The doctrine of metempsychosis, in contrast, awarded equality to all living entities, animal and human--which might explain why writers like Hays and Macaulay gravitated toward it.
Moreira's Metempsychosis is a programmatic work about reincarnation.
The conversation turns to dreams and Natasha suddenly feels a strange sensation: "I think when you remember, remember, remember everything like that, you could go until you remember what was there before you were in the world." Sonya replies that this resembles what the ancient Egyptians called metempsychosis. Natasha responds, "No, you know, I don't believe we were in animals [...].
A pronunciation appearing at the end of a famous exchange with regard to metempsychosis taking place in the city of Hangzhou (2, 200-04) is similar: the presence of such confessions of failed persuasion testifies probably not only to the irresistible attraction of the anecdote, but also to the problems of staging dialogue in a text that develops, the highly formulaic and literary episode of the martyrdom of the Franciscan friars (see Johnson) aside, like a long and self-confident monologue.
"At such times, the passage reads like a more orthodox version of Metempsychosis (1601), the satirical poem in which Donne sings "the progresse of a deathlesse soule" (1.1) through assorted incarnations, from the forbidden fruit in Eden through mandrake and lusty ape and eventually to a woman.
Playing upon Ovid's metaphor of the soul as wax, Dryden continues to criticize William in this passage on the progress of the soul by alluding to the alteration of the Great Seal that occurred after the Revolution, when William's image supplanted James's, as Hopkins notes ("Translation, Metempsychosis" 149-50): William's "Face assumes" (7: 247), with the connotations of pride, and William's image "deface[s]" (7: 251) the Seal, not only changing it but ruining it.
Throughout this metempsychosis, capital cannot be identified with any single thing since it must be embodied in several different kinds of things, and synchronously so if it is to be exchanged via money.
According to Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould's seminal work on lycanthropy and metempsychosis for badly damaged folk, 'The Book of Were-Wolves', published in 1865, I am doing fine at repressing my nature.
Desideri argues against what he calls "metempsychosis," the transmigration of souls, against the doctrine of emptiness, and against the non-theistic nature of their "false religion." He prepares a catechism designed to woo the elite away from their faith, the better to weaken its sway over the middle and lower classes.