metathesis

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metathesis

 [mĕ-tath´ĕ-sis]
1. artificial transfer of a morbid process.
2. a chemical reaction in which an element or radical in one compound exchanges places with another element or radical in another compound.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·tath·e·sis

(me-tath'ĕ-sis),
1. Transfer of a pathologic product (for example, a calculus) from one place to another where it causes less inconvenience or injury, when it is not possible or expedient to remove it from the body.
2. In chemistry, a double decomposition, wherein a compound, A-B, reacts with another compound, C-D, to yield A-C + B-D, or A-D + B-C.
[meta- + G. thesis, a placing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

me·tath·e·sis

(me-tath'ĕ-sis)
1. Transfer of a pathologic product (e.g., a calculus) from one place to another where it causes less inconvenience or injury, when it is not possible or expedient to remove it from the body.
2. chemistry A double decomposition, wherein a compound, A-B, reacts with another compound, C-D, to yield A-C + B-D, or A-D + B-C.
[meta- + G. thesis, a placing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Erroneous metathetic sequences of sounds also develop in adult language, but their rise is governed by principles different from those responsible for errors in the language of children (cf Drachman 1978).
The transposition of [r] and the vowel is by far the most frequent type of metathetic change in English.
Because such metathetic forms are lost in later Middle English this metathesis will be called here sporadic metathesis (SM), but the sense of the term is different from that in Hogg (1977).
Interestingly, our evidence, limited as it is, shows that metathesis must have been a very early process in this category of words because the early occurrences of metathetic forms with [Vr] registered in the available corpora are chronologically very early, sometimes even earlier than the original forms without metathesis.