metatheory


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metatheory

(met?a-the'a-re, -ther'e)
1. Knowledge about a discipline. For nursing theory, it is the most global (abstract) type of nursing theory. It focuses on broad issues that address the profession's most important concepts: the relationships among human beings, health, the environment, and nursing itself. See: metaparadigm
2. A theory about the knowledge of a discipline, such as the nature and structure of nursing knowledge.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) Steele's Theorizing Textual Subjects 176-201 closely follows her "Metatheory" 473, 477-96, but the discussions are framed differently.
One problem with 'critical' IPE approaches is their inclination for debates about concepts and metatheory rather than substantial, cumulative theory-building.
When trying to understand one's own worldview or metatheory one must be clear on what is being defined.
Connolly finds Isaac's distinction between "metatheory" and "first-order inquiry" naive, and proposes to replace these loaded terms with the idea of timeliness and untimeliness in political theory.
(3) The term metatheory refers to a comprehensive theoretical framework that synthesizes existing research on a topic.
After this defense of humdrum realism and traditional liberalism in a morally serious way, we are left to consider whether Gutting has cleared a path through the dark wood of metatheory using the light of rational analysis.
Although this book assumes a great deal of familiarity with the philosophy of science, it claims to develop a `naturalist realist metatheory' that could rescue both the natural and the social sciences from their alleged methodological failings and, further, provide a methodological bridge across the whole spectrum of sociological theorising.
But the deductive-nomological metatheory of Hempel and Oppenheim--even in its very name--distinguishes what Aristotle did not, thus following the path of Galileo and Hume.
We are writing because Deborah Padgett's (1998) article is misleading as a result of her misunderstanding of the distinction between a metatheory and a research method and the definition of naturalistic and interventionist research.
If the assignments are functions over some domain which is an object of the metatheory then we have accumulated all sub-domains of the hierarchy of relative interpretations after all and are back with standard model-theoretic semantics; and if we are not back there it is hard to see how we can give an explicit definition of satisfaction and thence of logical consequence.
It is viewed there as a technique of metatheory (theory about theories), by which scholars analyze not so much the subject matter of the scientific discipline as the cultural and psychological reasons particular scientists think the way they do.
Participants in the area have long recognized the need for greater unity among its assorted theoretical perspectives, or better, an over-arching metatheory to give structure to proffered conceptions of person-environment processes, thereby providing fertile ground for research.