metastatic calcification


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Related to metastatic calcification: dystrophic calcification

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

calcification occurring in nonosseous, viable tissue (that is, tissue that is not degenerated or necrotic), as in the stomach, lungs, and kidneys (and rarely in other sites); the cells of these organs secrete acid materials, and, under certain conditions in instances of hypercalcemia, the alteration in pH causes precipitation of calcium salts in these sites.

metastatic calcification

The deposition of calcium in otherwise normal, non-osseous tissue—e.g., kidneys, blood vessels (vascular media), lungs, stomach, heart and eyes—which is usually not associated with malignancy, due to increased levels of calcium in the serum. This contrasts to dystrophic calcification, in which serum calcium levels are normal and local tissue conditions set the stage for calcium deposition.

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(met'ă-stat'ik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in nonosseous, viable tissue in hypercalcemia.

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(met'ă-stat'ik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in nonosseous viable tissue in hypercalcemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pathogenesis of ectopic ossification is different from that of dystrophic and metastatic calcification. Ectopic ossification is believed to occur as the result of the transformation of primitive cells of a mesenchymal origin, which are present in the connective tissue septa, into osteoprogenitor cells.
(23.) Ghacha R, Sinha AK, Karkar AM: Spontaneous resolution of extensive periarticular metastatic calcification after renal transplant in a case of end stage renal disease.
Metastatic calcification affecting the myocardium and lungs is potentially lethal and is rarely detected before death, because of the absence of specific radiographic abnormalities.
Metastatic calcification may occur in patients with chronic renal failure, primary hyperparathyroidism, extensive bone malignancy, hypervitaminosis D, diffuse myelomatosis, and milk-alkali syndrome.
(7) The lung is one of the primary sites of metastatic calcification deposition and, although most patients are asymptomatic, respiratory failure may develop.
CT--in particular, high-resolution CT--may or may not detect metastatic calcification. When pulmonary abnormalities are present, they most commonly consist of parenchymal opacification or poorly defined infiltrates that may simulate pneumonia or pulmonary oedema.
Uptake of bone imaging agents by diffuse pulmonary metastatic calcification. AJR 1977; 129: 871-874.
We present a case of parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma with the primary lesion arising in the middle and inner ear, with associated diffuse skeletal metastases and metastatic calcifications.