metastasizing septicemia

me·tas·ta·siz·ing sep·ti·ce·mi·a

sepsis, with entry of microorganisms into the bloodstream leading to abscess formation at a distance from the original site of infection.

me·tas·ta·siz·ing sep·ti·ce·mi·a

(mĕ-tastă-sīz-ing septi-sēmē-ă)
Sepsis, with entry of microorganisms into bloodstream leading to abscess formation distant from original infection site.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a previous study, we showed that rhubarb, a traditional Chinese medicine, protected intestinal mucosal microvascular endothelial cells in rats with metastasizing septicemia. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of rhubarb on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)-induced vascular endothelial (VE) permeability.
In our previous study, we showed that intragastric administration of rhubarb, a traditional Chinese medicine, protected the intestinal mucosal capillary endothelial cells from damage in rats with metastasizing septicemia. It also increased the number of functional capillaries, promoted blood flow through intestinal mucosal capillaries, reduced thrombogenesis, and improved the blood and oxygen supply of the intestinal mucosa.[sup][6] However, since rhubarb contains multiple compounds, it remains unclear which compound(s) plays a key role in capillary protection during metastasizing septicemia.
In our previous study, we demonstrated that rhubarb has specific curative effects on gastrointestinal failures in rats with metastasizing septicemia.[sup][6],[30] The intragastric administration of rhubarb powder protected the intestinal mucosal capillary endothelial cells during metastasizing septicemia, which was associated with an increasing number of functional capillaries, stimulated blood flow of capillaries, reduced thrombogenesis, and improved supply of blood and oxygen to the intestinal mucosa.