metaphor

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metaphor

A high-level similarity between different things or processes. Metaphors can reflect a deep structural resonance or merely a superficial resemblance; cultural assumptions often rest on metaphors, which can be both incisive and misleading, valuable and dangerous.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Caballero (2007: 2100) observed that figurative language, especially metaphorical language and its subgroups, has been neglected in most studies on wine writing, many articles have focused on metaphor in wine language, both before and after Caballero made that statement (Coutier, 1994; Amoraritei, 2002; Gluck, 2003; Lehrer, 2007, 2009; Suarez-Toste, 2007; Negro 2011; among others).
Lakoff and Johnson (1980) claim that the ideas as concepts which may be seen in the metaphorical definitions are based on natural kinds of human experience, and concepts that are used in the metaphorical definitions to explain and describe other concepts may also correspond to natural kinds of experience.
Through the use of an important pass experience incident, deans discovered and examined metaphorical images that embodied the thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors associated with their experiences with angry students, and that was by exploring and answering the following questions:
From this it can be observed that one generally takes the characterization of the metaphorical phrase and the characterization of the subject and attempts to make the metaphorical characterization as fitting to the subject characterization as possible by searching for and finding features within the metaphorical characterization that optimally match those within the subject characterization (Croom 2008, p.
metaphorical language has a number of attributes that facilitate communication about God.
And this is just what Lossau is after: this tension between Conceptual and Minimalist approaches to sculpture and the metaphorical reach that has been a major part of what sculpture is about.
This problem is possibly even more intimidating than the one of linguistic metaphor identification: which metaphorical model in thought, exactly, is being used when people speak or write in particular metaphorical ways?
Botha explores some of the current views concerning the grounding of metaphorical meaning in experience and embodiment.
Cohen draws on Arnold Isenberg's seminal paper, 'Critical Communication', to help explain the function of metaphorical language.
Since the fact that there is a great diversity of linguistic evidence for patterns of metaphorical thought has been, by and large, not emphasized enough, I overview a variety of such evidence, which can be derived from the study of different aspects of meaning within a particular language, crosslinguistically, and at a metalinguistic level.
Harry the hypno-potamus; metaphorical tales for the treatment of children; v.2.