metamorphosis


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metamorphosis

 [met″ah-mor´fo-sis]
change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form. adj., adj metamor´phic.
fatty metamorphosis any normal or pathologic transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis),
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): allaxis, transformation (1)
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

metamorphosis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. metamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

metamorphosis

A marked transformation in appearance, form or substance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis)
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): transformation (1) .
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

metamorphosis

Major alterations in structure and appearance occurring in an organism, such as the human embryo, in the process of its development from egg (ovum) to baby.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

metamorphosis

the change in an organism from larval to adult form, which is often quite rapid, as in tadpole to frog, caterpillar to butterfly. Metamorphosis is said to be ‘incomplete’ where there is gradual development of a NYMPH to an adult, as in the EXOPTERYGOTA (Hetero- or Hemi-metabola), e.g. cockroach, locust. It is ‘complete’ where a pupa occurs, as in the ENDOPTERYGOTA (Holometabola), e.g. housefly, butterfly.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In Experiments 2-4, larval competence for metamorphosis was assayed twice per replicate before whole cultures were exposed to a metamorphic inducer.
Returning focus to the Elizabethan stage, a prominent example of neo-Ovidian 'metamorphosis proper' (that is, one of those 'overt nymph-to-tree or man-to-stag metamorphoses' that the author ordinarily eschewed) occurs in act 3, scene 1 of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream (ca 1595).
On the contrary, she writes, it encouraged it: "The abundance of stories of metamorphosis in the Middle Ages attests to the fascination of both theologians and writers of imaginative literature [for] the possibilities of approaching the borderline between men and animals, or even crossing it" (88).
For experiments with feeding larvae, 90% (163) reported the temperature, 98% (178) reported the food species that the larvae were fed, 75% (137) reported the feeding frequency, 78% (142) reported the food concentration, 92% (167) reported larval density, 30% (55) reported the time to competency in larvae, and 32% (59) reported the time to metamorphosis. Survivorship was reported in 51% (92) of experiments.
Through craftsmanship refined over generations, the pioneering spirit that fuelled Montblanc's early innovations lives on in the Montblanc Heritage Rouge & Noir Spider Metamorphosis Special Edition and Limited Edition 1906.
In order to clarify the concept of absurdity in The Metamorphosis, it is necessary to study the text carefully to understand how good and evil notions lead the main character to overwhelm in his alienation which makes him to reject any possible hope for his problems.
Velazquez does not give us the metamorphosis that Arachne is doomed to undergo in the poem--turned into a spider as she hangs herself to escape the jealous goddess's spite--but the entire painting is an eloquent transformation.
'That's why the exhibit is called 'metamorphosis,'' says Frondoso.
In its report "Mid-Year Update: The Metamorphosis of the US Marijuana Market Begins." the firm reiterates its expectation for US marijuana sales of USD6.5 billion for 2016 and extends its forecast to 2021 at which time it expects revenues to reach approximately USD30 billion, assuming marijuana will be legal in all 50 states in some capacity.
Metamorphosis highlights the synergistic effect between nature and technology through texture transformations within the same product; i.e., an oil that becomes a lotion during application.
Metamorphosis Opera Theater focuses on bringing people together in a learning community focusing on music and the arts.
Led by astronomers from the university, the team has discovered that a large proportion of galaxies have undergone a major "metamorphosis" since the big bang.