metamorphosis

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metamorphosis

 [met″ah-mor´fo-sis]
change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form. adj., adj metamor´phic.
fatty metamorphosis any normal or pathologic transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis),
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): allaxis, transformation (1)
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. metamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

metamorphosis

A marked transformation in appearance, form or substance.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis)
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): transformation (1) .
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

Major alterations in structure and appearance occurring in an organism, such as the human embryo, in the process of its development from egg (ovum) to baby.

metamorphosis

the change in an organism from larval to adult form, which is often quite rapid, as in tadpole to frog, caterpillar to butterfly. Metamorphosis is said to be ‘incomplete’ where there is gradual development of a NYMPH to an adult, as in the EXOPTERYGOTA (Hetero- or Hemi-metabola), e.g. cockroach, locust. It is ‘complete’ where a pupa occurs, as in the ENDOPTERYGOTA (Holometabola), e.g. housefly, butterfly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deshelled larvae settle and metamorphose normally, although they do not undergo shell dehiscence (Pennington and Hadfield, 1989).
This idea leads Bachelard to believe that metaphors are even "naturally linked to metamorphoses" and that in "the realm of imagination the metamorphosis of being is already an adjustment to the imagined environment" (55).
Apollonius draws on Empedocles elsewhere most notably in Orpheus' song on the origin of the universe at 1.497-511,(15) just as Ovid includes Empedoclean colouring in his cosmogony at the beginning of the Metamorphoses.(16) Peter Knox argues that the Speech of Pythagoras may be taken as a symptom of Ovid's Alexandrianism, pointing to Callimachus' use of Pythagoras in his poetry;(17) the Apollonian imitations of Empedocles show that in using this model as well Ovid continues an Alexandrian interest in earlier scientific poetry.
(2) Shakespeare's considerable indebtedness to Ovid's Metamorphoses and to Arthur Golding's 1567 English translation has long been acknowledged.
Keith makes a point of first treating the Hecale independently, to avoid a circular comparison of the Metamorphoses with an Ovid-influenced reconstruction of Callimachus.
In fact, the critic argues, both the insomnia plague (with biblical allusions) in Cien anos de soledad and the melting women in the Metamorphoses embody accounts of magical realism.
In the introduction, Keith and Rupp trace the reception of Ovid's Metamorphoses from his contemporaries to Ausonious, carefully noting both admiration for and condemnation of this influential work.
This is brightly developed in Carla Freccero's essay; particularly convincing is the textual identification and desire in Louise Labe's use of the Metamorphoses and Heroides.
After successful stints Off Broadway, both "Urinetown" and "Metamorphoses" transferred to Broadway theaters during the 2001-02 season.
The accumulation of these metamorphoses "dilutes" the phenomenon, and thus minimizes the effect of Adonis's metamorphosis that follows.
For example, haliotid larvae settle on encrusting red algae (Morse and Morse, 1984) and subsequently metamorphose over the next 2 to 7 days into juveniles (Crofts, 1937).
Metamorphoses Poem in 15 books, written in Latin about AD 8 by Ovid.