metamorphose

(redirected from metamorphosed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

metamorphose

(mĕt′ə-môr′fōz′, -fōs′)
v. metamor·phosed, metamor·phosing, metamor·phoses
v.tr.
1. To change into a wholly different form or appearance; transform: "His eyes turned bloodshot, and he was metamorphosed into a raging fiend" (Jack London).
2. To cause to undergo metamorphosis or metamorphism.
v.intr.
1. To be changed or transformed: "the man whom he would be if he could become, metamorphose into, the lover, the husband" (William Faulkner).
2. To undergo metamorphosis or metamorphism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, SrO content in carbonate minerals is a more sensitive indicator than MnO to distinguish carbonatite from sedimentary carbonate rocks metamorphosed to marble.
Just before the mass die-off, a tank containing 5,000 recently metamorphosed frogs had been emptied, and the population placed in three other tanks along with other frogs that had metamorphosed during the same week.
As larvae aged within Experiments I and IV, however, chlorpromazine itself stimulated substantial metamorphosis within the same 5-8-h exposure periods, and at least in some assays, apparently became less effective in blocking stimulation by excess [K.sup.+] For the larvae used in Experiment I, for example, only about 10% of the larvae that were subsampled on 17 May 2000 (Experiment Ia) metamorphosed in 10 [micro]M chlorpromazine within the first 6 h of exposure.
Dietrich now reports laboratory data showing that "doses below 16 [micro]g/l copper cause deformities and reduce activity in larval clams." Not only did the young mollusks stop swimming, but when they metamorphosed into their adult form, many exhibited shell and foot defects.
He married at an early age and became a widower only months later, a loss that metamorphosed the affable and pleasant young man into an impetuous character.
However, it is certain that metamorphism and deformation of gneisses north of the Isua greenstone predate 3490 Ma and that rocks adjacent to and within the greenstone belt were metamorphosed and deformed after 3490 Ma.
When Baldassare Castiglione began his famous discussion of sprezzatura, by speaking of the way in which a disciple can "transform himself" (trasformarsi) into his mentor, he used the word "transform," which is a translation of "metamorphosis" - the same words used by Pico della Mirandola, who spoke of man as a type of Proteus with the capacity to transform himself.(2) Castiglione, in fact, metamorphosed his own self when he adapted the persona of his wife in a poem about Raphael's portrait of him, in which she spoke of her husband's image as if Castiglione were alive in it, as if Raphael were the very type of Ovid's Pygmalion in bringing him to life?
At once a sociopolitical fable and a love story, the novel is narrated from a mud puddle by a masseuse in a beauty parlor who has metamorphosed into a pig and whose increased appetite for food and sex leads to a series of bizarre, often farcical, escapades.
Ratings soared and the show and its characters and situations have metamorphosed into a near-mythic cultural phenomenon.
His blood, gushing forth from beneath the rock, was metamorphosed by Galatea into a river bearing his name (Acis or Acinius--the modern river Jaci).
Ocyroe, too, seems to be metamorphosed in punishment for speaking too much, although, like the crow and the raven, she speaks the truth.
His best-known adult books are Turtle Diary (1975), made into a movie, about two lonely people who conspire to liberate a sea turtle from a zoo; and Riddley Walker (1981), about a twelve-year-old in the distant postnuclear future, when the English language has metamorphosed into a sinister simplicity.