metamorphose


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metamorphose

(mĕt′ə-môr′fōz′, -fōs′)
v. metamor·phosed, metamor·phosing, metamor·phoses
v.tr.
1. To change into a wholly different form or appearance; transform: "His eyes turned bloodshot, and he was metamorphosed into a raging fiend" (Jack London).
2. To cause to undergo metamorphosis or metamorphism.
v.intr.
1. To be changed or transformed: "the man whom he would be if he could become, metamorphose into, the lover, the husband" (William Faulkner).
2. To undergo metamorphosis or metamorphism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another Metamorphose designer, Kelly Erikson, was a makeup artist for the show last year and decided to participate as a designer this year.
In fact, atrazine-exposed pollywogs proved only about half as likely to metamorphose as those raised in clean water.
Such studies first require the ability to reliably identify when larvae become physiologically competent to metamorphose, and the ability to subsequently induce all competent larvae to metamorphose.
(My wish for him is that he starts being statesman-like because he said back then when he was campaigning that in due time, he would metamorphose into a statesman.
Approximately 10% of all species of salamander exhibit paedomorphosis, i.e., a life cycle where the larval salamander does not metamorphose (Lanoo, 2005).
Ordinarily, between 6 and 11 percent of leopard frog tadpoles survive and metamorphose into adults, notes coauthor Vance L.
Here's a mystery for you nature lovers: Why do some Mexican salamanders metamorphose, or change their physical appearance as they grow, while others don't?
In contrast, larvae of the prosobranch gastropod Crepidula fornicata do not become responsive to natural cues until 12 to 24 h after they can be induced to metamorphose by excess [K.sup.+] (Pechenik and Gee, 1993).
The eastern group has a life history that includes an obligate metamorphosis, the Mexican assemblage contains species that are obligately paedomorphic (i.e., fail to metamorphose and become reproductively mature while retaining larval morphology), and the west/central group has populations that can vary from metamorphic to facultatively paedomorphic.