metamorphopsia


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metamorphopsia

 [met″ah-mor-fop´se-ah]
defective vision, with distortion of the shape of objects seen.

met·a·mor·phop·si·a

(met'ă-mōr-fop'sē-ă),
Distortion of visual images.
[meta- + G. morphē, shape, + opsis, vision]

met·a·mor·phop·si·a

(met'ă-mōr-fop'sē-ă)
Distortion of visual images.
[meta- + G. morphē, shape, + opsis, vision]

metamorphopsia

Distortion or breakup of the perceived visual image either as a result of disruption of the normal relationship of the cones in the central part of the RETINA or as a result of brain damage or malfunction or the effects of HALLUCINOGENIC drugs.

metamorphopsia

An anomaly of visual perception in which objects appear distorted in shape or of different size or in a different location than the actual object. It may be due to a displacement of the visual receptors as a result of inflammation, tumour or retinal detachment, it can be of central origin (e.g. migraine, drug intoxication, neurosis or brain injury), or it can be induced by recently prescribed myopic correction (e.g. micropsia) or presbyopic correction (e.g. macropsia), etc. Metamorphopsia can be detected with an Amsler chart. See spasm of accommodation; dysmegalopsia; macular hole; pelopsia; teleopsia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patient reported that visual acuity remained stable but metamorphopsia was still present.
Metamorphopsia after successful retinal detachment surgery: an optical coherence tomography study.
Two-thirds of the participants did not report any symptoms of metamorphopsia or scotomas in their central visual fields.
Therefore, these authors would have had difficulty concluding that retinal hemorrhages caused blurring of vision and metamorphopsia in patients with dengue maculopathy.
There were no sequelae such as metamorphopsia and persistent central or paracentral scotoma, which were reported in up to 59.5% of 74 affected eyes at 2-year follow-up in a study by Teoh et al.
A 50-year-old Caucasian woman with no previous ocular pathologies was admitted to our department in 2011 presenting with reduced vision and metamorphopsia in her right eye.
The ocular symptoms included amaurosis fugax (22 cases), photophobia (5 cases), visual loss (24 cases), floaters (20 cases), metamorphopsia (3 cases), phosphenes (5 cases), diplopia (2 cases), and ocular/periorbital pain (7 cases).
Amsler grid test elucidated metamorphopsia in 70% of patients, which was more pronounced in just outside non-seeing area, positive scotoma in 78% and micropsia in 4% of patients.
"Decreased vision," "metamorphopsia," and "central scotoma" as three main symptoms of AMD were described by ten, three, and two respondents, respectively (data not shown).
Complications were persistent vitreous hemorrhage in one (3.33%) patient, failed drainage in one (3.33%) patient and metamorphopsia in one (3.33%) patient.
Jetrea treats vitreomacular traction and macular hole and was recommended for reimbursement, for treatment of patients showing symptoms of metamorphopsia, whose impact is considered severe and distressing, and equal to loss of two lines in visual acuity.
However, she complained about objects appearing large and bright in front of one eye and small and dull in front of the other (metamorphopsia).