metal

(redirected from metal implants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

metal

 [met´'l]
any chemical element marked by luster, malleability, ductility, and conductivity of electricity and heat, and which will ionize positively in solution. adj., adj metal´lic.
alkali metal one of a group of monovalent elements including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium.
metal fume fever an occupational disorder with malaria-like symptoms occurring in those engaged in welding and other metallic operations and due to the volatilized metals. It includes brassfounder's fever (brass chill, brazier's chill) and spelter's fever (zinc chill, zinc fume fever).
heavy metal one with a high specific gravity, usually defined to be above 5.0.
heavy metal poisoning poisoning with any of the heavy metals, particularly antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, thallium, or zinc.
noble metal a metal that is highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion.

met·al (M),

(met'ăl),
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, usually characterized by properties such as luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

metal

An element generally characterised by conductivity, ductility, lustre and malleability.

met·al

(met'ăl)
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, characterized by luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity and heat, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

met·al

(met'ăl)
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, characterized by luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity and heat, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

Patient discussion about metal

Q. Allergy to Nickel- can it happen? i though that only organic materials can cause allergy… but I started a new job that exposed me to Nickel and have, or so it seems, an allergic reaction to it…

A. Of course it can happen! Here you go:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/nickel-allergy/DS00826

Q. I was told that platinum is used in fragrances for the fullness of the spray. Please tell me more! Three years ago I was diagnosed with off the lab chart levels of platinum in my body. I have no hobby or avenue for exposure other than my work. I have sold fragrances for over ten years. Even the Regional EPA Air Quality person doesnt know where I am getting this. I was told by a health director who made some calls. He told me that platinum is used in fragrances for the "fullness of the spray". Would you please tell me more about this? Thank you!

A. Thank you Joseph83! What list of materials shall I look at? I know that the FDA doesn't regulate these products; also, I wonder if there is a masking name for platinum. I have so much of this in me, it just has to come from somewhere! I'm amazed that the EPA SUPPOSEDLY doesn't know where its coming from either.

More discussions about metal
References in periodicals archive ?
The rates may increase up to 10-20% under local inflammatory conditions, including periodontitis and allergic reactions against the metal implant [1].
Under anaesthesia all internal metal implants were removed.
Cellular bio-corrosion of metal implants and effects of metal ions on bone cells and immune cells.
This is a fully automatic method which detects metal implants and reduces streaking artifacts.
"However, the vast majority of patients implanted with these joints still have good results with their metal implants after five years."
Last month, a study prompted close monitoring of 65,000 patients with "large head" metal on metal implants following high failure rates.
Most recently, fully metal implants have been in the news for the damage they have caused in the bodies of several people who have them.
Prof Joe Dias, President of the British Orthopaedic Association told the Daily Telegraph that around 5.5 per cent of the large metal on metal implants needed to be replaced because of wear and tear within five years compared to around two per cent of the standard metal on plastic ones.
DePuy ASR implants have been found to lead to increased risk of problems compared to other metal on metal implants and were the subject of a recall in 2010.
However, several years later, the hobby has grown into a near obsession, with her body almost totally covered in images, dozens of piercings, and several metal implants in her skull.
On a positive note, the contemporary surgical approach utilizes tiny metal implants to hold the toes straight instead of wires, and patients are often back on their feet in a couple weeks.